leed

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See also: LEED, Leed, and leeˊd

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English leed, lede, shortened variant of leden ‎(language), from Old English lēoden ‎(popular or national language, native tongue), from Old English lēod ‎(poeple, nation). Cognate with Scots leid ‎(language), Dutch lied ‎(song). More at lede.

Noun[edit]

leed ‎(plural leeds)

  1. (Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) Language; tongue.
  2. (Britain dialectal, Scotland) A national tongue (in contrast to a foreign language).
  3. (Britain dialectal, Scotland) The speech of a person or class of persons; form of speech; talk; utterance; manner of speaking or writing; phraseology; diction.
  4. (Britain dialectal, Scotland) A strain in a rhyme, song, or poem; refrain; flow.
  5. (Britain dialectal, Scotland) A constant or repeated line or verse; theme.
  6. (Britain dialectal, Scotland) Patter; rigmarole.

Related terms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *lēt. The adjective descends from Proto-Germanic *laidaz, the noun from *laidą.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

leed n ‎(uncountable)

  1. grief, sorrow
  2. harm

Adjective[edit]

leed ‎(comparative leder, superlative leedst)

  1. (Belgium) angry
  2. sad

Declension[edit]

Inflection of leed
uninflected leed
inflected lede
comparative leder
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial leed leder het leedst
het leedste
indefinite m./f. sing. lede ledere leedste
n. sing. leed leder leedste
plural lede ledere leedste
definite lede ledere leedste
partitive leeds leders

Verb[edit]

leed

  1. singular past indicative of lijden

Anagrams[edit]


Luxembourgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German leid. Cognate with German leid, Dutch leed.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

leed ‎(masculine {{{1}}}, feminine {{{2}}}, neuter {{{3}}})

  1. sorry

Declension[edit]

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Related terms[edit]


Middle English[edit]

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Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English lēode ‎(people, men), plural of lēod ‎(man, person) (masc.), also “nation, people group, ethnicity, nationality” (fem.), akin to Old Frisian liod, Old Saxon liud, Old Norse ljóðr, lýðr, Old High German liut, Dutch lieden, German Leute ‎(people). Akin to Old English lēodan ‎(to grow, spring forth).

Noun[edit]

leed ‎(plural common noun and collective noun, plural leeds or leeden)

  1. People; persons collectively.
    English leed
  2. Countrymen, compatriots; vassals.
    These fellows be my very own leed.
  3. Man, person; human being.
  4. Race, nation; nationality; kindred.
    Land and Lede

Etymology 2[edit]

Unknown

Noun[edit]

leed

  1. A copper kettle or caldron.
    A furnace of a leed. --Chaucer.

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

leed

  1. (Spain) Informal second-person plural (vosotros or vosotras) affirmative imperative form of leer.