lege

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Lege, lège, legë, legę, and -lege

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

lege (uncountable)

  1. (US, colloquial) Clipping of legislature.

Etymology 2[edit]

Abbreviated from allege (to assert).

Verb[edit]

lege (third-person singular simple present leges, present participle leging, simple past and past participle leged)

  1. (obsolete) To allege; to assert.
    • 1508, John Fisher, Treatise concernynge ... the seven penytencyall Psalms
      Not onely he legeth his mercy to bynde his reason, but also his wysdome.
    • c. 1360, Geoffrey Chaucer, Court of Love
      To reson faste, and ledge auctoritie.

Etymology 3[edit]

Clipping of legend.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

lege (uncountable)

  1. (Ireland, slang) A legend; colloquially used to describe a person who is held in high regard.

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse leika, from Proto-Germanic *laikaną (to jump, play), cognate with Norwegian leike, leke, Swedish leka, Gothic 𐌻𐌰𐌹𐌺𐌰𐌽 (laikan).

Verb[edit]

lege (past tense legede, past participle leget)

  1. to play
  2. to spawn
Inflection[edit]
Usage notes[edit]

In compounds: "lege-".

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun[edit]

lege c

  1. indefinite plural of leg

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eːɣə

Verb[edit]

lege

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of legen

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

lege

  1. inflection of legen:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. singular imperative
    3. first/third-person singular subjunctive I

Interlingua[edit]

Noun[edit]

lege (plural leges)

  1. law

Verb[edit]

lege

  1. present of leger
  2. imperative of leger

Ladin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin lex, legem.

Noun[edit]

lege m (plural leges)

  1. law

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

lege

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of legō

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lēge

  1. ablative singular of lēx

Lombard[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • legg, lesg (Milanese classical orthography)
  • legge (Cremonese orthography)
  • lez (Brescian classical orthography)

Etymology[edit]

From Latin lex, legem (law).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Modern Western) IPA(key): /ˈleːdʒ(e)/, [leːtʃ], [ˈleːdʒe]
  • (Modern Eastern) IPA(key): /ˈleːdʒe/, [ˈledʒe]
  • (Classical Western) IPA(key): /ˈleːz/, [leːʃ]
  • (Classical Eastern) IPA(key): /ˈleːz/, [les]

Noun[edit]

lege f (plural legi)

  1. law
  2. rule

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Late Latin leuca, leuga, from Proto-Celtic *lewgā.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɛːɡ(ə)/, /ˈlɛu̯ɡ(ə)/, /ˈlɛːk(ə)/

Noun[edit]

lege (plural leges)

  1. league (unit of meaurement)
Descendants[edit]
  • English: league
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman lige, liege; further etymology is disputed.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈleːdʒ(ə)/, /ˈliːdʒ(ə)/

Noun[edit]

lege (plural leges or lege)

  1. (One of) one's subjects or vassals; (one of) those under one's control.
  2. A hireling or servant; one serving under another.
  3. (rare) One's feudal overlords or superiors.
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lege

  1. Able to command obedience from one's inferiors.
  2. Pledged to obey one's superiors; subject to duty by an authority.
  3. (rare) Otherwise bound by feudal obligations.
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Danish læge.

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /leː.ɡɛ/, [²leː.ɡə]

Noun[edit]

lege m (definite singular legen, indefinite plural leger, definite plural legene)

  1. a doctor

Synonyms[edit]

Verb[edit]

lege (imperative leg, present tense leger, passive leges, simple past lega or leget or legte, past participle lega or leget or legt, present participle legende)

  1. to heal, cure

Related terms[edit]

lækje (Bokmål)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Danish læge through Norwegian Bokmål lege. Confer also lækjar, which is borrowed from Swedish.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lege m (definite singular legen, indefinite plural legar, definite plural legane)

  1. doctor (physician)
    Synonyms: dokter, lækjar
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse lega.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

lege f (definite singular lega, indefinite plural leger, definite plural legene)

  1. the act of lying (resting in a horizontal position)
  2. a place where something lies, e.g. an animal
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Participle[edit]

lege

  1. neuter singular of legen

Verb[edit]

lege

  1. supine of liggje
  2. supine of ligge

References[edit]


Pennsylvania German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare German legen, Dutch leggen, English lay.

Verb[edit]

lege

  1. to lay
  2. to put, to place

Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin lēgem, accusative of lēx, from Proto-Italic *lēg-, from Proto-Indo-European *leǵ-s, from *leǵ- (to gather).

Noun[edit]

lege f (plural legi)

  1. law
  2. (archaic) religion, belief (in God or a divinity), credence
Declension[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

lege

  1. third-person singular/plural present subjunctive of lega