lex

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Lex

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From lexical analysis, from lexical

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

lex ‎(third-person singular simple present lexes, present participle lexing, simple past and past participle lexed)

  1. (computing) To perform lexical analysis; to convert a character stream to a token stream as a preliminary to parsing.
    • 1994, Donna K Harman, National Institute of Standards and Technology, The Second Text REtrieval Conference (TREC-2)
      Once this is done, each processor parses and lexes its own documents, using conventional programming techniques.
    • 2004, Richard William Sharp, Higher-level hardware synthesis
      SAFL source is lexed and parsed into an abstract syntax tree.
    • 2007, Don Syme, Adam Granicz, Antonio Cisternino, Expert F#
      Lexing and parsing do not have to be separated, and there are often convenient .NET methods for extracting information from text in particular formats...

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lēx f ‎(genitive lēgis); third declension

  1. a law, legal motion, bill
  2. (figuratively) agreement, condition, understanding

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative lēx lēgēs
genitive lēgis lēgum
dative lēgī lēgibus
accusative lēgem lēgēs
ablative lēge lēgibus
vocative lēx lēgēs

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • lex in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • lex in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • LEX in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to give the state a constitution: rem publicam legibus et institutis temperare (Tusc. 1. 1. 2)
    • (a state) has its own laws, is autonomous: suis legibus utitur (B. G. 1. 45. 3)
    • a law is adopted: lex perfertur
    • the laws of Solon ordained that..: Solonis legibus sanctum erat, ut or ne
    • a law is valid: lex rata est (opp. irrita)
    • without breaking the law: salvis legibus (vid. sect. X. 7, note Notice...)
    • the law orders, forbids (expressly, distinctly): lex iubet, vetat (dilucide, planissime)
    • a legislator: legum scriptor, conditor, inventor
    • (ambiguous) a legislator: qui leges scribit (not legum lator)
    • to free from legal obligations: legibus solvere
    • (ambiguous) this is our natural tendency, our destiny; nature compels us: ita (ea lege, ea condicione) nati sumus
    • (ambiguous) the rules of speech, grammar: leges dicendi
    • (ambiguous) to hold by the letter (of the law): verba ac litteras or scriptum (legis) sequi (opp. sententia the spirit)
    • (ambiguous) the constitution: instituta et leges
    • (ambiguous) to give the state a constitution: civitati leges, iudicia, iura describere
    • (ambiguous) to bring a bill before the notice of the people: legem, rogationem promulgare (Liv. 33. 46)
    • (ambiguous) to propose a law in the popular assembly: legem ferre or simply ferre ad populum, ut...
    • (ambiguous) to support a bill (before the people): legem suadere (opp. dissuadere)
    • (ambiguous) to support a bill (before the people): pro lege dicere
    • (ambiguous) to formally propose a law to the people: legem rogare or rogare populum (cf. sect. XVI. 4, note Aulus Gellius...)
    • (ambiguous) to carry a law (said of the magistrate): legem perferre (Liv. 33. 46)
    • (ambiguous) to reject a bill: legem antiquare (opp. accipere, iubere)
    • (ambiguous) to vote for a law: legem sciscere (Planc. 14. 35)
    • (ambiguous) to ratify a law (used of the people): legem iubere
    • (ambiguous) to let a bill become law (of the people and senate): legem sancire
    • (ambiguous) Solo ordained by law that..: Solo lege sanxit, ut or ne
    • (ambiguous) to replace an old law by a new: legem abrogare (Att. 3. 23. 2)
    • (ambiguous) to abolish a law: legem tollere (Leg. 2. 12. 31)
    • (ambiguous) to protest against a law (used of the veto, intercessio, of plebeian tribunes): legi intercedere
    • (ambiguous) to bring a law before the notice of the people: legem proponere in publicum
    • (ambiguous) to engrave a law upon a brazen tablet: legem in aes incīdere
    • (ambiguous) to declare a law valid: legem ratam esse iubere
    • (ambiguous) to transgress a law: a lege discedere
    • (ambiguous) the law says..: in lege scriptum est, or simply est
    • (ambiguous) the spirit of the law: sententia or voluntas legis
    • (ambiguous) to make laws (of a legislator): leges scribere, facere, condere, constituere (not dare)
    • (ambiguous) a legislator: qui leges scribit (not legum lator)
    • (ambiguous) to swear obedience to a law: in legem iurare (Sest. 16. 37)
    • (ambiguous) to be bound by a law: lege teneri
    • (ambiguous) on condition of..: ea lege, ut
    • (ambiguous) a thing is illegal: aliquid contra legem est
    • (ambiguous) to upset the whole constitution: omnes leges confundere
    • (ambiguous) lawlessness; anarchy: leges nullae
    • (ambiguous) to go to law with a person: (ex) iure, lege agere cum aliquo
    • (ambiguous) to be condemned under the Lex Plautia: lege Plautia damnari (Sall. Cat. 31. 4)
  • lex in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • lex in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  1. ^ Sihler, Andrew L. (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press
  2. ^ Palmer, L.R. (1906) The Latin Language, London, Faber and Faber