lax

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See also: LAX

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English lax, from Old English leax(salmon), from Proto-Germanic *lahsaz(salmon), from Proto-Indo-European *laḱs-(salmon, trout). Cognate with Middle Dutch lacks, lachs, lasche(salmon), Middle Low German las(salmon), German Lachs(salmon), Norwegian laks(salmon), Danish laks(salmon), Swedish lax(salmon), Icelandic lax(salmon), Lithuanian lašišà(salmon), Latvian lasis, Russian лосо́сь(losósʹ, salmon), Albanian leshterik(eel-grass). See also lox.

Noun[edit]

lax ‎(plural laxes)

  1. (now chiefly Britain dialectal, Scotland) A salmon.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin laxus(wide, roomy, loose)

Adjective[edit]

lax ‎(comparative laxer, superlative laxest)

  1. lenient and allowing for deviation; not strict.
    The rules are fairly lax, but you have to know which ones you can bend.
    • J. A. Symonds
      Society at that epoch was lenient, if not lax, in matters of the passions.
  2. loose; not tight or taut.
    The rope fell lax.
    • Ray
      the flesh of that sort of fish being lax and spongy
  3. lacking care; neglectful, negligent
    • 2011 October 1, Phil Dawkes, “Sunderland 2 - 2 West Brom”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      Prior to this match, Albion had only scored three league goals all season, but Wes Brown's lax marking allowed Morrison to head in their fourth from a Chris Brunt free-kick and then, a minute later, the initial squandering of possession and Michael Turner's lack of pace let Long run through to slot in another.
  4. (archaic) Having a looseness of the bowels; diarrheal.
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

lax ‎(uncountable)

  1. (slang) Lacrosse.
    • 2010, Kate Kingsley, Pretty on the Outside (page 79)
      “I'm not playing lax this term,” Mimah said.

Dacian[edit]

Noun[edit]

lax

  1. The edible wild purslane plant.

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin laxus

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lax ‎(comparative laxer, superlative am laxesten)

  1. lax
  2. (morale or ethics) easy, loose

Declension[edit]

External links[edit]

  • lax in Duden online

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old Norse lax, from Proto-Germanic *lahsaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lax m ‎(genitive singular lax, nominative plural laxar)

  1. salmon

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *laks, from the same source as laciō(entice).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lax f ‎(genitive lacis); third declension

  1. deception, fraud

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative lax lacēs
genitive lacis lacum
dative lacī lacibus
accusative lacem lacēs
ablative lace lacibus
vocative lax lacēs

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “laciō”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 321

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

lax

  1. rafsi of lanxe.

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse lax, from Proto-Germanic *lahsaz. The 1000kr meaning comes from the color of the 1000kr bill which was the same color as a salmon.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lax c

  1. salmon
  2. (slang) a bill with nominal value 1000 kronor or the corresponding amount of money

Declension[edit]

Inflection of lax 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative lax laxen laxar laxarna
Genitive lax laxens laxars laxarnas

Derived terms[edit]