lax

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See also: Lax and LAX

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English lax, from Old English leax (salmon), from Proto-West Germanic *lahs (salmon), from Proto-Germanic *lahsaz (salmon), from Proto-Indo-European *laḱs- (salmon, trout). Cognate with Middle Dutch lacks, lachs, lasche (salmon), Middle Low German las (salmon), German Lachs (salmon), Norwegian laks (salmon), Danish laks (salmon), Swedish lax (salmon), Icelandic lax (salmon), Lithuanian lašišà (salmon), Latvian lasis, Russian лосо́сь (losósʹ, salmon), Albanian leshterik (eel-grass). Doublet of lox.

Noun[edit]

lax (plural laxes)

  1. (now chiefly Britain dialectal, Scotland) A salmon.

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Latin laxus (wide, roomy, loose).

Adjective[edit]

lax (comparative laxer, superlative laxest)

  1. Lenient and allowing for deviation; not strict.
    The rules are fairly lax, but you have to know which ones you can bend.
    • 1886, John Addington Symonds, Philip Sidney
      Society at that epoch was lenient, if not lax, in matters of the passions.
  2. Loose; not tight or taut.
    The rope fell lax.
    • 1701, John Ray, The Wisdom of God Manifested in the Works of the Creation, [], 3rd edition, London: [] Sam[uel] Smith, and Benj[amin] Walford, [], OCLC 1103011139, part II, page 355:
      The Fleſh of this ſort of [cartilaginous] Fiſh being lax and ſpungy, and nothing ſo firm, ſolid and weighty as that of the bony Fiſhes, and there being a good quantity of Air contained in the Cavity of their Abdomen, they cannot ſink in the Water without letting in ſome of it by theſe Holes (the Orifices whereof are opened and ſhut at pleaſure by the help of Muſcles provided for that purpoſe) into the hollow of their Bellies, whereby they preponderate the Water and deſcend; []
    • 1979, “Genetical Studies on Dense and Lax Panicles In Rice”, in Japan. J. Breed., volume 29, number 2, page 151:
      Sreedharan and Mirsa (1973) reported that two lax panicle mutants, designated as nude panicle mutation, were obtained from the M2 of two rice cultivars.
  3. Lacking care; neglectful, negligent.
    • 2011 October 1, Phil Dawkes, “Sunderland 2 – 2 West Brom”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      Prior to this match, Albion had only scored three league goals all season, but Wes Brown's lax marking allowed Morrison to head in their fourth from a Chris Brunt free-kick and then, a minute later, the initial squandering of possession and Michael Turner's lack of pace let Long run through to slot in another.
  4. (mathematics) Describing an associative monoidal functor.
  5. (archaic) Having a looseness of the bowels; diarrheal.
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

lax (uncountable)

  1. (slang) Lacrosse.
    • 2010, Kate Kingsley, Pretty on the Outside (page 79)
      “I'm not playing lax this term,” Mimah said.

Anagrams[edit]


Dacian[edit]

Noun[edit]

lax

  1. The edible wild purslane plant.

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin laxus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lax (comparative laxer, superlative am laxesten)

  1. lax
  2. (morale or ethics) easy, loose

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • lax” in Duden online

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse lax, from Proto-Germanic *lahsaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lax m (genitive singular lax, nominative plural laxar)

  1. salmon

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *laks, from the same source as laciō (entice).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lax f (genitive lacis); third declension

  1. deception, fraud

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative lax lacēs
Genitive lacis lacum
Dative lacī lacibus
Accusative lacem lacēs
Ablative lace lacibus
Vocative lax lacēs

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Mozarabic:
    Arabic: لْياجّى(ʎači)
    Hebrew: ליאַג֗יִ(ʎači)

References[edit]

  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “laciō”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 321
  • lax in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • lax in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English leax, from Proto-West Germanic *lahs, from Proto-Germanic *lahsaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lax (plural lax or laxes)

  1. salmon

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Old Norse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *lahsaz. Cognate with Old English leax, German Lachs, English lox, Old High German lahs, Yiddish לאַקס‎(laks‎).

Noun[edit]

lax m (genitive lax, plural laxar)

  1. (zoology) salmon

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • lax in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Swedish[edit]

A salmon pink 1000 SEK banknote from 1894.

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse lax, from Proto-Germanic *lahsaz.

The 1000 kr meaning is possibly referring to the old pink color of the 1000 kr bill, the same color as a salmon. Older similar older slang words are skäring, from skär (pink); räka (prawn); tegel (brick); röding (char), from röd (red); all referring to the red-pinkish color of the 1000 kr bill. Color and animal-related nicknames for bills used to be quite common, e.g. grönsiska (siskin; 6 riksdaler 32 skillingar), kanariefågel (canary bird; 32 skillingar) and fågel blå (“blue bird; 500 riksdaler”).

An alternative possibility is a Romani origin, cf. Hindi लाख (lākh, 100,000)}, from Sanskrit लक्ष (lakṣa), but such a Romani word is not attested. Cf. lakan with the same meaning.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lax c

  1. salmon
  2. (slang) a bill with nominal value 1000 kronor or the corresponding amount of money
    Synonyms: lakan, långschal, skäring, papp

Declension[edit]

Declension of lax 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative lax laxen laxar laxarna
Genitive lax laxens laxars laxarnas

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Monica Golabiewski Lannby (2009-12-03), “Sedlarna som satte färg på språket”, in Språktidningen[2], retrieved 2021-11-26
  • Monica Golabiewski Lannby (2009), “’LAXAR’ – de skära tusenlapparna”, in Svensk numismatisk tidskrift[3], issue 8, Svenska numismatiska föreningen
  • Gerd Carling (2005), “lax”, in Romani i svenskan: Storstadsslang och standardspråk, Stockholm: Carlsson, →ISBN, page 89