glee

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See also: g'lée

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English gle, from Old English glēo, glīġ, glēow, glīw ‎(glee, pleasure, mirth, play, sport; music; mockery), from Proto-Germanic *glīwą ‎(joy, mirth), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰlew- ‎(to joke, make fun, enjoy). Cognate with Scots gle, glie, glew ‎(game, play, sport, mirth, joy, rejoicing, entertainment, melody, music), Old Norse glȳ ‎(joy, glee, gladness), Ancient Greek χλεύη ‎(khleúē, joke, jest, scorn). A poetic word in Middle English, the word was obsolete by 1500, but revived late 18c.

Noun[edit]

glee ‎(countable and uncountable, plural glees)

  1. (uncountable) Joy; merriment; mirth; gaiety; particularly, the mirth enjoyed at a feast.
    • 1968, The Rolling Stones, “Sympathy for the Devil” (song), in Beggars Banquet (album): 
      I watched with glee while your kings and queens fought for ten decades for the gods they made.
    • 2013 June 29, “Travels and travails”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8842, page 55: 
      Even without hovering drones, a lurking assassin, a thumping score and a denouement, the real-life story of Edward Snowden, a rogue spy on the run, could be straight out of the cinema. But, as with Hollywood, the subplots and exotic locations may distract from the real message: America’s discomfort and its foes’ glee.
  2. (uncountable) Music; minstrelsy; entertainment.
  3. (music, countable) An unaccompanied part song for three or more solo voices, not necessarily merry.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Limburgish[edit]

Noun[edit]

glee f

  1. something that is wet because it has been pasted together

Inflection[edit]

Inflection
Root singular Root plural Diminutive singular Diminutive plural
Nominative glee gleeër gleeke gleekes
Genitive glee gleeër gleekes gleekes
Locative glöj glöjjer glöjke glöjkes
Dative¹ glöje gleeër  ?  ?
Accusative¹ glee gleeërn gleeke gleekes
  • Dative and accusative are nowadays obsolete, use nominative instead.

See also[edit]