schadenfreude

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See also: Schadenfreude

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from German Schadenfreude (joy in the misfortune of others), from Schaden (damage, misfortune) + Freude (joy). The word gained popularity in English in the late 20th c.[1] and likely entered mainstream usage through an episode of The Simpsons[2] (more in citations).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈʃɑːdənfɹɔɪdə/ enPR: shäʹdənfroidə
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔɪdə

Noun[edit]

schadenfreude (uncountable)

  1. Malicious enjoyment derived from observing someone else's misfortune.
    • 1897, Thomas Bailey Saunders (translator), “Human Nature”, in The Essays of Arthur Schopenhauer, translation of original by Arthur Schopenhauer:
      But it is Schadenfreude, a mischievous delight in the misfortunes of others, which remains the worst trait in human nature.
    Antonym: confelicity

Quotations[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ schadenfreude at Google Ngram Viewer
  2. ^ “Words at play: schadenfreude”, in Merriam Webster[1], accessed November 8, 2016

Further reading[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from German Schadenfreude (joy in the misfortune of others), from Schaden (damage, misfortune) + Freude (joy).

Noun[edit]

schadenfreude (first-person possessive schadenfreudeku, second-person possessive schadenfreudemu, third-person possessive schadenfreudenya)

  1. schadenfreude: malicious enjoyment derived from observing someone else's misfortune.

Further reading[edit]