cume

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From cumulative; compare cumulate.

Verb[edit]

cume (third-person singular simple present cumes, present participle cuming, simple past and past participle cumed)

  1. (film) Earn cumulatively at the box office.

Usage notes[edit]

Particularly in past or perfect forms, as “cumed” or “has cumed”, since “cumulative box office receipts” is primarily a backwards-looking concept.

Noun[edit]

cume (plural cumes)

  1. (film) Cumulative box office receipts.
  2. (radio) Cumulative radio audience.
    • 2004, Steve Warren, Radio
      Compare cume to the number of shoppers that go into a supermarket. Let's imagine that the station has no listeners and the supermarket has no shoppers.
    • 2011, Gary Dahl, Advertising For Dummies
      If a particular station has a cume of 250,000, but most listeners are women and only a very few are within your target demo, then this 250,000 figure doesn't help you.
  3. (education) Cumulative grade point average.
    • 1965, Matt Fichtenbaum and Dan Murphy, “The Institute Screw” in The Broadside of Boston, vol. III, No. 22:
      The pucks don’t bounce, the trains don’t spring, my cume is gonna fall,
      And unless I pass that final quiz I’ll be screwed right to the wall.

Adjective[edit]

cume (not comparable)

  1. (film) Cumulative.
    • 1988, Hugh Malcolm Beville, Audience Ratings: Radio, Television, and Cable
      Cume ratings provide measures of net unduplicated audience for various combinations...
    • 2016, Alan B. Albarran, Management of Electronic and Digital Media
      Cume persons represent a radio station's cumulative audience, or the estimated number of individuals reached by a radio station.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Cume da Moa, O Pindo, Carnota, Galicia

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

15th century. From Latin culmen, from Proto-Indo-European *kelH-. Cognate with Portuguese cume and Spanish cumbre.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cume m (plural cumes)

  1. mountain top, summit
    Synonyms: cumio
  2. ridge, roof top
    • 1433, Rodríguez González, Ángel / José Armas Castro (eds.), Minutario notarial de Pontevedra (1433-1435). Santiago de Compostela: Consello da Cultura Galega, page 63:
      a qual casa se ten por parede con outra casa de Juan Peres, notario da dita villa, de hũa parte, da outra parta se ten por cume et tavoado con outra mia casa
      the aforementioned house is next to the wall of another one that belongs to Juan Perez, notary of this town, in one side, and in the other is touching, by the ridge and the wooden wall, with another house of my property
    Synonyms: cima, cumio
  3. ridge board
    • 1457, Tato Plaza, Fernando R. (ed.) (1999): Libro de notas de Álvaro Pérez, notario da Terra de Rianxo e Postmarcos. Santiago: Concello da Cultura Galega (Ponencia de Lingua)., page 185:
      Jtem diso máis que leuara de dentro da grãja de Saar, estando presente Martj́n de Dorrõ, hũu cume de castaño de des cóuodos, pouco máis o menos
      Item, he said more, that he had taken from the inside of the farm of Sar, in the presence of Martín de Dorrón, a chestnut ridge board, of some ten cubits long, give or take
    Synonyms: crucel, cumio
  4. top position
    Synonyms: cima, cúspide
  5. summit (gathering of leathers, etc)
    Synonyms: cumio

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • cume” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • cume” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • cume” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.



Istriot[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *quomo (from Latin quomōdo) + et. Compare Italian come, French comme, Romanian cum.

Adverb[edit]

cume

  1. how
    • 1877, Antonio Ive, Canti popolari istriani: raccolti a Rovigno, volume 5, Ermanno Loescher, page 99:
      Cume li va puleîto in alto mare!
      How they row well on the high seas!

See also[edit]


Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *kūmo, from Proto-Germanic *kūmô.

Adverb[edit]

cume

  1. barely, only just
  2. almost, nearly

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • cume”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • cume”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Old English[edit]

Verb[edit]

cume

  1. Subjunctive present singular form of cuman
  2. Imperative singular form of cuman

Old French[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

cume

  1. Alternative form of conme

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese, from Latin culmen, from Proto-Italic *kolamen, from Proto-Indo-European *kelH-.

Noun[edit]

cume m (plural cumes)

  1. peak, the highest point of a mountain.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]