ave

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See also: ave., 'ave, avé, avè, avë, Ave, Ave., and AVE

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin ave.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɑːveɪ/, /ˈæveɪ/, /ˈeɪvi/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɑːveɪ, -æveɪ, -eɪvi

Noun[edit]

ave (plural aves)

  1. An Ave Maria.
    Ye’ll come and find the place where I am lying
    And kneel and say an ave there for me.
  2. A reverential salutation.

Etymology 2[edit]

Abbreviation.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ave (plural aves)

  1. Abbreviation of avenue.
  2. Abbreviation of average.

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse agi (fear, discipline).

Noun[edit]

ave c

  1. discipline, keeping in check
    Du skal holde forureningen i ave.
    You must keep the pollution in check.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin āve.

Noun[edit]

ave n (singular definite avet, plural indefinite ave)

  1. Ave Maria
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse aga (frighten, scare).

Verb[edit]

ave (imperative av, infinitive at ave, present tense aver, past tense avede, perfect tense har avet)

  1. discipline, check, restrain
Conjugation[edit]

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From avo +‎ -e

Adverb[edit]

ave

  1. grandfatherly (in the manner or way of a grandfather)

Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ava.

Noun[edit]

ave f (plural avis)

  1. grandmother

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese ave, from Latin avis, avem, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éwis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ave f (plural aves)

  1. bird

Interlingua[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin avis.

Noun[edit]

ave (plural aves)

  1. bird

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin ave.

Interjection[edit]

ave

  1. hail

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ave.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈa.ve/
  • Rhymes: -ave
  • Hyphenation: à‧ve

Interjection[edit]

ave

  1. hail

Noun[edit]

ave f

  1. plural of ava

Anagrams[edit]


Kabuverdianu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese ave.

Alternative forms[edit]

  • avi (Sotavento)

Noun[edit]

ave

  1. (Barlavento) bird

References[edit]

  • Gonçalves, Manuel (2015) Capeverdean Creole-English dictionary, →ISBN
  • Veiga, Manuel (2012) Dicionário Caboverdiano-Português, Instituto da Biblioteca Nacional e do Livro

Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed with an unspelled /h/ from Punic *ḥawe (live!, 2sg. imp.), cognate to Hebrew חוה(Eve), and as avō from Punic *ḥawū (2pl. imp.), from Semitic root ḥ-w-y (live). The form might have been contaminated by Etymology 2, especially as the latter one's long vowel also ended up short via iambic shortening; this would explain the reluctance to spell the aspirate, as well as its interpretation as a verb form. Attested since Plautus.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈha.u̯e/, [ˈhäu̯ɛ]
  • (Literary affectation) (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈa.u̯eː/, [ˈäu̯eː]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈa.ve/, [ˈäːvɛ]
  • Note: around the 1st c. CE, the current pronunciation remained the etymological IPA(key): /ha.vĕ/, with the long-vowel unaspirated form possible as a literary affectation, or as a poetic license.[1]

Interjection[edit]

avē̆

  1. hail, hello, greetings! (a formal expression of greeting)
    Avē̆ atque valē!
    Hail and farewell! (esp. before a long departure and as a last good-bye to the dead).
    Avē̆ imperātor, moritūrī tē salūtant!
    Hail, commander, the ones going to their deaths salute you!
    Synonym: (h)avētō
Usage notes[edit]
  • Outside of grammarians, the plural (h)avēte is attested only once in Apuleius, who is known for affecting archaisms. This suggests that this greeting didn't usually inflect for number, reflecting its originally being an interjection and not a verbal form; nevertheless, it was eventually widely interpreted as the latter.
  • The other verbal forms cited by grammarians are the future imperative avētō , ille (greetings to you, him) etc., and the infinitive in the circumlocution avēre volō (after the same use with valēre and the very rare salvēre).
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

avē

  1. second-person singular present imperative of aveō

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun[edit]

ave m

  1. vocative singular of avus

Etymology 4[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun[edit]

ave f

  1. ablative singular of avis

References[edit]

  1. ^ Marcus Fabius Quintilianus (la), “Declamationes Minores”, in latin.packhum.org[1], retrieved 2021-04-01, 1.6.1.1

Further reading[edit]

  • ave in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • ave in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)

Northern Sami[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈave/

Verb[edit]

ave

  1. inflection of avvit:
    1. present indicative connegative
    2. second-person singular imperative
    3. imperative connegative

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ave (hail!).

Noun[edit]

ave n (definite singular avet, indefinite plural aver, definite plural ava or avene)

  1. An Ave Maria

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ave (hail!).

Noun[edit]

ave n (definite singular avet, indefinite plural ave, definite plural ava)

  1. An Ave Maria

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Old Portuguese[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin avis (bird), from Proto-Italic *awis (bird), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éwis (bird).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ave f

  1. bird
Descendants[edit]
  • Galician: ave
  • Portuguese: ave

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin avē (hail).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈa.βe/, /a.ˈβɛ/

Noun[edit]

ave f

  1. hail (introduces a formal greeting)
Descendants[edit]

Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin avē̆, from Punic *ḥawe.

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

ave

  1. ave! (reverential salutation)

Further reading[edit]

  • ave in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • ave in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Portuguese ave (bird), from Latin avis, avem (bird), from Proto-Italic *awis (bird), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éwis (bird).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): (Brazil) /ˈa.vi/, [ˈa.vi]
  • IPA(key): (Portugal) /ˈa.vɨ/, [ˈa.vɨ]

Noun[edit]

ave f (plural aves)

  1. bird
    Todas as aves têm asas.
    All birds have wings.
    Synonym: pássaro

Descendants[edit]

  • Kabuverdianu: avi

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Portuguese ave, from Latin avē (hail).

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

ave!

  1. hail (introduces a formal greeting)
    Ave César!
    Hail Caesar!
    Synonym: salve
  2. Clipping of ave Maria.
Derived terms[edit]

Sardinian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ave f (plural aves)

  1. (Logudorese) Alternative form of ae
    Synonyms: achedda, puzone

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈabe/, [ˈa.β̞e]
  • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Spanish ave, inherited from Latin avis, avem, from Proto-Italic *awis (bird), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éwis.

Noun[edit]

ave f (plural aves)

  1. bird
    Synonym: (especially small birds) pájaro
  2. (Chile) fowl, poultry
Usage notes[edit]
  • The feminine noun ave is like other feminine nouns starting with a stressed /a/ sound in that it takes the articles el and un (normally reserved for masculine nouns) in the singular when there is no intervening adjective:
el ave
un ave
  • However, if an adjective, even one that begins with stressed /a/ such as alta or ancha, intervenes between the article and the noun, the article reverts to la or una.
Hyponyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Spanish ave, from Latin avē (hello, hail).

Interjection[edit]

ave

  1. (used when coming into a house) hello, hail

Etymology 3[edit]

From the acronym AVE (Alta Velocidad Española), meaning high-speed train (written mostly all caps).

Noun[edit]

ave f (plural aves)

  1. (Spain) train
    Cogeremos el ave el día 23 por la tarde.
    We will take the train on the 23rd in the afternoon.

Further reading[edit]


Tolai[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • avet (when not preceding a verb)

Pronoun[edit]

ave

  1. First-person exclusive plural pronoun: they (many) and I, them (many) and me

Declension[edit]



Venetian[edit]

Noun[edit]

ave

  1. plural of ava