vag

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See also: väg, vág, and våg

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Abbreviation of vagina.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vag (plural not attested)

  1. (US slang, chiefly vulgar) Vulva.

Etymology 2[edit]

Abbreviation of vagrant.

Verb[edit]

vag (third-person singular simple present vags, present participle vagging, simple past and past participle vagged)

  1. (transitive, slang) To arrest somebody as a vagrant.
    • 2002, T. R. St. George, Clyde Strikes Back (page 250)
      But I seen on the TV it was colder'n a witch's tit here so I stayed. Stuck it out. Then I caught a freight and got vagged.

Etymology 3[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vag (plural vags)

  1. (Britain, dated, dialect, Devon) turf used as fuel
    • 1983, Hemery, Eric, High Dartmoor, Land and People, ISBN 9780709188599, page 91:
      Localities where vags were cut are sometimes so named: e.g. Vag(s) Hill (Row Brook, Double Dart); Vag Hill (Glaze Brook, Avon).
    • 1984 October 5, Baden Fuller, A. A. (Commons Commissioner), “Course of proceedings”, in In the Matter of Gidleigh Common, Gidleigh, West Devon District, Devon[1], page 5:
      They had not driven their ponies over the Unit Land; she had probably cut a vag from the Unit Land but this was done only in the presence of witnesses to determine whether those objecting were vigilant to stop any exercise of this right, and only on one occasion.
    • 1985 January 21, Baden Fuller, A. A. (Commons Commissioner), quoting Hutchings, Thomas, “4 Nattadon Road/28 Meldon Road”, in In the Matter of Chagford Common, Meldon Common, Nattadon Common, Padley Common, Weekbrook Down, Week Down, Steniel Down, and Jurston Green all in Chagford, West Devon District, Devon[2], page 14:
      I first grazed ponies on Padley in 1932 and my ponies are grazing there still. I take bracken for the garden, rushes to cover my potato clam, bean sticks for the garden and I expect I am one of the few who still cut vags (peat) on common land for fuel.

Verb[edit]

vag (third-person singular simple present vags, present participle vagging, simple past and past participle vagged)

  1. (Britain, archaic, dialect, Devon) To drag; to trail on the ground.
    • 1892, Hewett, Sarah, The Peasant Speech of Devon[3], page 140:
      Düee 'old up yer frock, an' not let 'n vag along like that; tha bottom aw'n 'll be tiffled out, and covered wi' mucks.
  2. (Britain, archaic, dialect, Devon) To bend; to give; to yield.
  3. (Britain, dated, dialect, Devon) To flap; to blow in the wind.
    • 1967, Williamson, Henry, A Solitary War:
      Smoke immediately vagged about in the parlour chimney.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French vague

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /vaːɡ/, [væːˀj], [væjˀ]

Adjective[edit]

vag

  1. vague

Inflection[edit]

Inflection of vag
Positive Comparative Superlative
Common singular vag vagere vagest2
Neuter singular vagt vagere vagest2
Plural vage vagere vagest2
Definite attributive1 vage vagere vageste
1) When an adjective is applied predicatively to something definite, the corresponding "indefinite" form is used.
2) The "indefinite" superlatives may not be used attributively.

Livonian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Related to Finnish vako.

Noun[edit]

vag

  1. furrow

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vagus, via French vague

Adjective[edit]

vag (neuter singular vagt, definite singular and plural vage, comparative vagere, indefinite superlative vagest, definite superlative vageste)

  1. vague

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vagus, via French vague

Adjective[edit]

vag (neuter singular vagt, definite singular and plural vage, comparative vagare, indefinite superlative vagast, definite superlative vagaste)

  1. vague

References[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French vague, Latin vagus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

vag m, n (feminine singular vagă, plural vagi)

  1. vague

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French vague, from Latin vagus (unsteady, wandering).

Adjective[edit]

vag (comparative vagare, superlative vagast)

  1. vague
    själens subtilaste infall, dess vagaste föreställningar, dess flyktigaste drömmar
    the soul's most subtle inventions, its vaguest conceptions, its most volatile dreams

Declension[edit]

Inflection of vag
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular vag vagare vagast
Neuter singular vagt vagare vagast
Plural vaga vagare vagast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 vage vagare vagaste
All vaga vagare vagaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

vag (plural vags)

  1. emptiness

Declension[edit]