vagabond

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French vagabond, from Late Latin vagābundus, from Latin vagari (wander).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Canada, UK) enPR: văg'ə-bŏnd, IPA(key): /ˈvæɡ.ə.bɒnd/
    • (file)

Noun[edit]

vagabond (plural vagabonds)

  1. A person on a trip of indeterminate destination and/or length of time.
  2. One who wanders from place to place, having no fixed dwelling, or not abiding in it, and usually without the means of honest livelihood.
    Synonyms: vagrant, hobo; see also Thesaurus:vagabond
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, [] (King James Version), London: [] Robert Barker, [], OCLC 964384981, Genesis 4:12:
      When thou tillest the ground, it shall not henceforth yeeld vnto thee her strength: A fugitiue and a vagabond shalt thou be in the earth.
    • 1926, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Land of Mist[1]:
      "Here is the beastly thing. 'Every person professing to tell fortunes or using any subtle craft, means or device to deceive and impose on any of His Majesty's subjects shall be deemed a rogue and a vagabond', and so on and so forth."

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

vagabond (third-person singular simple present vagabonds, present participle vagabonding, simple past and past participle vagabonded)

  1. To roam, as a vagabond

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

vagabond (not comparable)

  1. Floating about without any certain direction; driven to and fro.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book 10”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: [] [Samuel Simmons], [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554:
      To heaven their prayers / Flew up, nor missed the way, by envious winds / Blown vagabond or frustrate.
    • 1959, Jack London, The Star Rover
      Truly, the worships of the Mystery wandered as did men, and between filchings and borrowings the gods had as vagabond a time of it as did we.

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Late Latin vagābundus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

vagabond (feminine singular vagabonde, masculine plural vagabonds, feminine plural vagabondes)

  1. vagabonding

Noun[edit]

vagabond m (plural vagabonds, feminine vagabonde)

  1. vagabond

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Piedmontese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vagabond m (plural vagabond)

  1. vagabond

Related terms[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French vagabond.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vagabond m (plural vagabonzi)

  1. tramp (a homeless person)