bland

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See also: Bland and blând

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /blænd/
  • Rhymes: -ænd
  • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin blandus (pleasant, flattering).

Adjective[edit]

bland (comparative blander, superlative blandest)

  1. Having a soothing effect; not irritating or stimulating.
    a bland oil
    a bland diet
  2. Lacking in taste, flavor, or vigor.
    The coffee was bland.
    • 2012, John Shepherd, ‎David Horn, Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World
      First and foremost, alternative country artists generally claim to reject mainstream country music as musically indistinguishable from bland pop music, as lyrically superficial, and as having no artistic merit []
  3. (figuratively) Lacking interest; boring; dull.
    • 1996, “Country House”, in The Great Escape, performed by Blur:
      He's reading Balzac and knocking back Prozac / It's a helping hand that makes you feel wonderfully bland
  4. (now rare) Mild; soft, gentle, balmy; smooth in manner; suave.
    • 1818, John Keats, Sonnet:
      Where didst thou find, young Bard, thy sounding lyre? / Where the bland accent, and the tender tone?
    • 1907, Robert William Chambers, chapter IX, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 24962326:
      “A tight little craft,” was Austin’s invariable comment on the matron; []. ¶ Near her wandered her husband, orientally bland, invariably affable, and from time to time squinting sideways, as usual, in the ever-renewed expectation that he might catch a glimpse of his stiff, retroussé moustache.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English blanden, blonden, from Old English blandan (to blend, mix, mingle; trouble, disturb, corrupt), from Proto-Germanic *blandaną (to mix, blend). Cognate with Icelandic blanda, Norwegian, Danish blande, Swedish blanda. See also blend.

Verb[edit]

bland (third-person singular simple present blands, present participle blanding, simple past and past participle blanded)

  1. (transitive, Britain dialectal) To mix; blend; mingle.
  2. (transitive, Britain dialectal) To connect; associate.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English bland, from Old English bland, blond (blending, mixture, confusion), from Proto-Germanic *blandą (a mixing, mixture), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰlendʰ- (to grow turbid, dim, see badly, be blind). Cognate with Icelandic blanda (a mixture of liquids, especially of hot whey and water).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

bland (plural blands)

  1. (Britain dialectal) Mixture; union.
  2. A summer beverage prepared from the whey of churned milk, common among the inhabitants of the Shetland Islands.
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Danish[edit]

Verb[edit]

bland

  1. imperative of blande

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin blandus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

bland (not comparable)

  1. (medicine) bland

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bland n (genitive singular blands, no plural)

  1. mix

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

bland

  1. imperative of blande

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Verb[edit]

bland

  1. imperative of blande

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

bland

  1. among