stan

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See also: Stan, śtan, stán, ştan, -stan, stan', and -стан

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Derived from the 2000 hip-hop song song "Stan" by the American rapper Eminem, a fictional account of the rapper's encounter with an overly obsessive fan of him.

Noun[edit]

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stan (plural stans)

  1. (slang, sometimes pejorative) A maniacal, overzealous, overly obsessed fan of a celebrity, particularly one whose fixation with the celebrity is unhealthy or intrusive.
Hypernyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

  • Back formation from names of countries that end with -stan.

Noun[edit]

stan (plural stans)

  1. Singular form of the generic term stans meaning some ex-Soviet countries and their neighbours whose name ends with "-stan" such as Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and Kasakhstan.
    • 2015 July 30, Jules Boykoff, “Beijing and Almaty contest Winter Olympics in human rights nightmare”, in The Guardian[[1]]:
    • This is a stan with a plan. Unlike Uzbekistan.

Pronunciation[edit]

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Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from South Proto-Slavic *stanъ (lodging) (compare Bulgarian стан (stan) ‘camp’, Serbo-Croatian ста̑н (stȃn) ‘apartment’); Romanian stână and Greek στάνη (stáni) also from Slavic.

Noun[edit]

stan m

  1. shepherd's hut
  2. pen (for sheep)

Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *stanъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stan m

  1. tent

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • stan in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • stan in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *stāną.

Verb[edit]

stān

  1. to stand

Descendants[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *stainaz, from Proto-Indo-European *stāino-, *stī-no- (a suffixed form of *stāi- (to be solid, to crowd together)); cognate with Old Frisian stēn, Old Saxon stēn, Old Dutch stein (Dutch steen), Old High German stein (German Stein), Old Norse steinn (Danish and Swedish sten), Gothic 𐍃𐍄𐌰𐌹𐌽𐍃 (stains). The Indo-European root is also the source of Ancient Greek στῖον (stîon, pebble), Slavic *stēnā- (Bulgarian and Russian стена (stena), Czech stěna (wall)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stān m

  1. stone

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *stāną.

Verb[edit]

stān

  1. to stand

Conjugation[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *stanъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stan m inan

  1. state (of affairs), condition
  2. state (political division of the United States)
  3. (rare) state (sovereign polity)

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • stan in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *stanъ, from Proto-Indo-European *steh₂- (to stand, stay), whence also stȁti (to stand), stȁviti (to set, place), stȁdo (herd) and stȏl (table).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stȃn m (Cyrillic spelling ста̑н)

  1. flat, apartment
  2. loom (tkàlačkī stȃn)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Quotations[edit]

References[edit]

  • stan” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Slovak[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *stanъ, from Proto-Indo-European *steh₂- (to stand, stay), whence also stáť (to stand), staviť (to set, place), stádo (herd) and stôl (table).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stan m (genitive singular stanu, nominative plural stany, genitive plural stanov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. tent
  2. (slang) erection, hard-on

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • stan in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

Swedish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Contraction of staden, definite singular of stad.

Noun[edit]

stan

  1. (colloquial) the town, the city
    stan
    downtown

Usage notes[edit]

  • Stockholmers insist that stan always refers to Stockholm and no other cities. The phrase inte i stan (not in the town) to them means outside of Stockholm, but to other Swedes it means outside of any town, i.e. in the countryside.