stan

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Stan (Stanley), after the song Stan by Eminem (2000),[1] a fictitious account of the rapper's encounter with an overly obsessive fan named Stan. Sometimes assumed to be a blend of stalker +‎ fan, but perhaps simply chosen for the rhyme.[2]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK, North America) IPA(key): /stæn/
  • enPR: stăn
  • Rhymes: -æn
  • (file)
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

stan (plural stans)

  1. (slang, sometimes derogatory) An extremely obsessive fan of a person, group, character, or creative work, particularly one whose fixation is unhealthy or intrusive.
    IU stan; K-pop stan
    • 2011, Vanessa Spates, "Whether in Britney's Army or Rihanna's Navy, stans need to surrender to sanity", The Lantern (Ohio State University), Volume 132, Number 16, 11 October 2011, page 9A:
      I know the in-depth detailed life of a stan because I am one. I'm one of those Lady Gaga fans, []
    • 2013, "Selena Gomez: She Is My Queen", Sunday Tribune (South Africa), 17 March 2013:
      I am the biggest stan for Selena because she is my queen. She made Disney interesting and I have always watched her.
    • 2013, Jake Folsom, "Stans take dedication to extreme heights online, in real life", Washington Square News, Volume 41, Number 104, 5 December 2013, page 11:
      Incidents have occurred with stans showing up to pop stars' residences, as has happened with Madonna, Taylor Swift and others.
    • 2020 June 21, “TikTok Teens and K-Pop Stans Say They Sank Trump Rally”, in New York Times[2]:
      K-pop stans have been getting increasingly involved in American politics in recent months. After the Trump campaign solicited messages for the president’s birthday on June 8, K-pop stans submitted a stream of prank messages.
Hypernyms[edit]
Hyponyms[edit]

Verb[edit]

stan (third-person singular simple present stans, present participle stanning, simple past and past participle stanned)

  1. (slang, transitive, intransitive) To act as a stan (for); to be an obsessive fan (of).
    We stan a queen.

Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Back-formation from -stan

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stan (plural stans)

  1. One of the stans; any of the ex-Soviet countries and their neighbours whose name ends with "-stan" such as Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and Kazakhstan.
    • 2015 July 30, Jules Boykoff, “Beijing and Almaty contest Winter Olympics in human rights nightmare”, in The Guardian[3]:
      This is a stan with a plan. Unlike Uzbekistan [] .

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Eminem; Dido; Paul Herman (lyrics and music), “Stan”, in The Marshall Mathers LP, 2000, performed by Eminem: “ [] truly yours, your biggest fan, this is Stan”
  2. ^ Lili Feinberg, “The emergence of the ‘stan’”, in Oxford Dictionaries Blog[1], 20 July 2015, archived from the original on 2015-07-23

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from a South Slavic language, ultimately derived from Proto-Slavic *stanъ (lodging). Compare Bulgarian стан (stan, camp), Serbo-Croatian stȃn (apartment);[1] non-Slavic cognates include Romanian stână and Greek στάνη (stáni).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stan m (indefinite plural stane, definite singular stani, definite plural stanet)

  1. shepherd's hut
  2. herd of sheep or other livestock

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Omari, Anila, “stan”, in Marrëdhëniet Gjuhësore Shqiptaro-Serbe, Tirana, Albania: Krishtalina KH, 2012, page 268-269

Czech[edit]

Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *stanъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stan m

  1. tent

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • stan in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • stan in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

stan (plural stanes or stan)

  1. Alternative form of stone

Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *stāną.

Verb[edit]

stān

  1. to stand

Inflection[edit]

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Dutch: stâen
    • Dutch: staan
      • Afrikaans: staan
    • Limburgish: staon

Further reading[edit]

  • “stān”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek[4], 2012

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *stain, from Proto-Germanic *stainaz, from Proto-Indo-European *steyh₂no-, *stih₂-no- (a suffixed form of *steyh₂- (to be solid, to crowd together)); cognate with Old Frisian stēn, Old Frisian stēn, Old Dutch stein (Dutch steen), Old High German stein (German Stein), Old Norse steinn (Danish sten, Swedish sten), Gothic 𐍃𐍄𐌰𐌹𐌽𐍃 (stains). The Indo-European root is also the source of Ancient Greek στῖον (stîon, pebble), Proto-Slavic *stēnā- (Bulgarian стена (stena), Russian стена́ (stená), Czech stěna (wall)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stān m

  1. stone

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *stāną.

Verb[edit]

stān

  1. to stand

Conjugation[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *stanъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stan m inan

  1. state (of affairs), condition
  2. state (political division of the United States)
  3. (rare) state (sovereign polity)

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • stan in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • stan in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Serbo-Croatian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sh

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *stanъ, from Proto-Indo-European *steh₂- (to stand, stay), whence also stȁti (to stand), stȁviti (to set, place), stȁdo (herd) and stȏl (table).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stȃn m (Cyrillic spelling ста̑н)

  1. flat, apartment
  2. loom (tkàlačkī stȃn)

Declension[edit]

Quotations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • stan” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Slovak[edit]

Slovak Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sk

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *stanъ, from Proto-Indo-European *steh₂- (to stand, stay), whence also stáť (to stand), staviť (to set, place), stádo (herd) and stôl (table).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stan m (genitive singular stanu, nominative plural stany, genitive plural stanov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. tent
  2. (slang) erection, hard-on

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • stan in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

Swedish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Contraction of staden, definite singular of stad.

Noun[edit]

stan

  1. (colloquial) the town, the city
    stan
    downtown

Usage notes[edit]

  • Stockholmers insist that stan always refers to Stockholm and no other cities. The phrase inte i stan (not in the town) to them means outside of Stockholm, but to other Swedes it means outside of any town, i.e. in the countryside.

Anagrams[edit]