stan

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See also: Stan, -stan, and śtan

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Blend of stalker and fan. Influenced by the 2000 Eminem song "Stan," a fictional account of the rapper's encounter with an obsessive, mentally unstable fan.

Noun[edit]

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stan ‎(plural stans)

  1. (slang, sometimes pejorative) An extremely loyal and obsessed fan, particularly one whose fixation with a celebrity is unhealthy or intrusive.
  2. Singular form of the generic term stans meaning some ex-soviet union countries, and their neighbours, where the country name ends with "-stan". Such as Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Kasakhstan, and so on.
    • This is a stan with a plan. Unlike Uzbekistan.

Hypernyms[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from South Proto-Slavic *stanъ ‎(lodging) (compare Bulgarian стан ‎(stan) ‘camp’, Serbo-Croatian ста̑н ‎(stȃn) ‘appartment’); Romanian stână and Greek στάνη ‎(stáni) also from Slavic.

Noun[edit]

stan m

  1. shepherd's hut
  2. pen (for sheep)

Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *stanъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stan m

  1. tent

Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *stāną.

Verb[edit]

stān

  1. to stand

Descendants[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *stainaz, from Proto-Indo-European *stāino-, *stī-no- (a suffixed form of *stāi- ‎(to be solid, to crowd together)); cognate with Old Frisian stēn, Old Saxon stēn, Old Dutch stein (Dutch steen), Old High German stein (German Stein), Old Norse steinn (Danish and Swedish sten), Gothic 𐍃𐍄𐌰𐌹𐌽𐍃 ‎(stains). The Indo-European root is also the source of Ancient Greek στῖον ‎(stîon, pebble), Slavic *stēnā- (Bulgarian and Russian стена ‎(stena), Czech stěna ‎(wall)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stān m

  1. stone

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *stāną.

Verb[edit]

stān

  1. to stand

Conjugation[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *stanъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stan m

  1. state (of affairs), condition
  2. state (political division of the United States)
  3. (rare) state (sovereign polity)

Declension[edit]

External links[edit]

  • stan in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *stanъ, from Proto-Indo-European *steh₂- ‎(to stand, stay), whence also stȁti ‎(to stand), stȁviti ‎(to set, place), stȁdo ‎(herd) and stȏl ‎(table).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stȃn m (Cyrillic spelling ста̑н)

  1. flat, apartment
  2. loom (tkàlačkī stȃn)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Quotations[edit]

References[edit]

  • stan” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Swedish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Contraction of staden, definite singular of stad.

Noun[edit]

stan

  1. (colloquial) the town, the city
    stan
    downtown

Usage notes[edit]

  • Stockholmers insist that stan always refers to Stockholm and no other cities. The phrase inte i stan ‎(not in the town) to them means outside of Stockholm, but to other Swedes it means outside of any town, i.e. in the countryside.