solum

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See also: Solum

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin solum (base, bottom; soil). Doublet of soil.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

solum (plural solums or sola)

  1. Within a soil profile, a set of related soil horizons that share the same cycle of pedogenic processes.
  2. The upper layers of a soil profile that are affected by climate.

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Italic *solom (base, sole), from Proto-Indo-European *solom or *selom (place, habitation). Cognate with Lithuanian salà (island), Proto-Slavic *selo (village) and Proto-Germanic *saliz (house, dwelling; hall, room).[1] Related to Latin solea (sandal, hoof-guard, fettle).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

solum n (genitive solī); second declension

  1. bottom, ground, base, foundation, bed
  2. floor, pavement
  3. ground, earth, land, soil
  4. sole (of the foot)
  5. (by extension) land, country, region, place
Declension[edit]

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative solum sola
Genitive solī solōrum
Dative solō solīs
Accusative solum sola
Ablative solō solīs
Vocative solum sola
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Basque: zoru
  • Catalan: sòl
  • English: solum
  • French: sol, seuil
  • Galician: soio, sollo, solo

References[edit]

  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “solum”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 572

Etymology 2[edit]

Adverbial accusative of sōlus (alone, only).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

sōlum (not comparable)

  1. only, just, barely, merely
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Adjective[edit]

sōlum

  1. inflection of sōlus:
    1. neuter nominative/accusative/vocative singular
    2. masculine accusative singular

References[edit]

  • solum in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • solum in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • solum in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • solum in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) Solon, one of the seven sages: Solo, unus de septem (illis)
    • (ambiguous) Solo ordained by law that..: Solo lege sanxit, ut or ne
    • (ambiguous) to leave one's country (only used of exiles): solum vertere, mutare (Caecin. 34. 100)
    • (ambiguous) Solon made it a capital offence to..: Solo capite sanxit, si quis... (Att. 10. 1)
    • (ambiguous) to raze a town to the ground: oppidum solo aequare