globe

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See also: Globe and glóbe

English[edit]

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A globe.

Etymology[edit]

From late Middle English globe, from Middle French globe, from Old French globe, borrowed from Latin globus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

globe (plural globes)

  1. Any spherical (or nearly spherical) object.
    the globe of the eye; the globe of a lamp
  2. The planet Earth.
    • 1866, John Locke, A System of Theology
      But whatever opinion or theory may be formed by any one, all agree that at some period or other this world has been destroyed by water, and that the proofs of this assertion are found in every part of the globe
    • 2013 July 19, Timothy Garton Ash, “Where Dr Pangloss meets Machiavelli”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 6, page 18:
      Hidden behind thickets of acronyms and gorse bushes of detail, a new great game is under way across the globe. Some call it geoeconomics, but it's geopolitics too. The current power play consists of an extraordinary range of countries simultaneously sitting down to negotiate big free trade and investment agreements.
  3. A spherical model of Earth or any planet.
  4. (dated or Australia, South Africa) A light bulb.
    • 1920, Southern Pacific Company, Southern Pacific bulletin: volumes 9-10 (page 26)
      Don't ask for a new globe just because the old one needs dusting. The old-style carbon lamps wasted electricity when they began to fade and it was economy to replace them.
  5. A circular military formation used in Ancient Rome, corresponding to the modern infantry square.
  6. (slang, chiefly in the plural) A woman's breast.
  7. (obsolete) A group.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

globe (third-person singular simple present globes, present participle globing, simple past and past participle globed)

  1. (intransitive) To become spherical.
  2. (transitive) To make spherical.

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French globe, from Latin globus (sphere, globe).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡloːbə/, [ˈɡ̊loːb̥ə]

Noun[edit]

globe c (singular definite globen, plural indefinite glober)

  1. globe

Inflection[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French globe, borrowed from Latin globus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

globe m (plural globes)

  1. globe

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

globe

  1. vocative singular of globus

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin globus.

Noun[edit]

globe m (plural globes)

  1. roll (of paper, etc.)
  2. globe (sphere showing a representation of the Earth)

Descendants[edit]

  • English: globe
  • French: globe

References[edit]

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (globe)
  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (globe, supplement)