glob

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Possibly a blend of blob +‎ gob or a clipping of globule. An element of sound symbolism is clearly involved: compare such phonetically and semantically similar words as glop, gop, blob, clump and clod. (Still, globe, clump and clod may be related via the Proto-Indo-European root *gel-.[1])

In the biological sense, proposed by Bevil R. Conway and Doris Y. Tsao, by analogy with the cytochrome-oxidase "blobs" of V1, an earlier stage in the hierarchical elaboration of colour. (Can this(+) etymology be sourced?)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɡlɑb/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɡlɒb/

Noun[edit]

glob (plural globs)

  1. A round, shapeless or amorphous lump, as of a semisolid substance.
    He put a glob of paint into the cup and went on painting.
  2. (programming) A limited pattern matching technique using wildcards, less powerful than a regular expression.
  3. (biology) A millimeter-sized colour module found beyond the visual area V2 in the brain's parvocellular pathway.

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

glob (third-person singular simple present globs, present participle globbing, simple past and past participle globbed)

  1. To stick in globs or lumps.
  2. (programming) To carry out pattern matching using a glob.

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pokorny, Julius (1959) Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), Bern, München: Francke Verlag, page 359

Further reading[edit]

  • glob” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.

Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

glob m inan

  1. globe

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • glob in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French globe, from Latin globus.

Noun[edit]

glob n (plural globuri)

  1. globe (all senses)

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

glob c

  1. a globe

Declension[edit]

Declension of glob 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative glob globen glober globerna
Genitive globs globens globers globernas

Related terms[edit]