brag

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English braggen (to make a loud noise; to speak boastfully) of unknown origin. Possibly related to the Middle English adjective brag (prideful; spirited), which is probably of Celtic origin;[1] or from Old Norse bragr (best; foremost; poetry);[2] or through Old English from Old Norse braka (to creak).[3]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bɹæɡ/
  • Hyphenation: brag
  • Rhymes: -æɡ
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

brag (plural brags)

  1. A boast or boasting; bragging; ostentatious pretence or self-glorification.
  2. The thing which is boasted of.
    • 1634 October 9 (first performance), [John Milton], H[enry] Lawes, editor, A Maske Presented at Ludlow Castle, 1634: [] [Comus], London: Printed [by Augustine Matthews] for Hvmphrey Robinson, [], published 1637, OCLC 228715864; reprinted as Comus: [] (Dodd, Mead & Company’s Facsimile Reprints of Rare Books; Literature Series; no. I), New York, N.Y.: Dodd, Mead & Company, 1903, OCLC 1113942837:
      Beauty is Nature's brag.
    • 2015 October 27, Matt Preston, The Simple Secrets to Cooking Everything Better[1], Plum, →ISBN, page 192:
      You could just use ordinary shop-bought kecap manis to marinade the meat, but making your own is easy, has a far more elegant fragrance and is, above all, such a great brag! Flavouring kecap manis is an intensely personal thing, so try this version now and next time cook the sauce down with crushed, split lemongrass and a shredded lime leaf.
  3. (by ellipsis) The card game three card brag.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chesterfield to this entry?)

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

brag (third-person singular simple present brags, present participle bragging, simple past and past participle bragged)

  1. (intransitive) To boast; to talk with excessive pride about what one has, is able to do, or has done; often as an attempt to popularize oneself.
    to brag of one's exploits, courage, or money
  2. (transitive) To boast of.

Synonyms[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

brag (comparative bragger, superlative braggest)

  1. Excellent; first-rate.
  2. (archaic) Brisk; full of spirits; boasting; pretentious; conceited.
    • (Can we date this quote by Ben Jonson and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
    a brag young fellow

Adverb[edit]

brag (comparative more brag, superlative most brag)

  1. (obsolete) proudly; boastfully
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Fuller to this entry?)

References[edit]

  1. ^ brag” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.
  2. ^ wile” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.;
  3. ^ brag in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse brak.

Noun[edit]

brag n (singular definite braget, plural indefinite brag)

  1. bang, crash

Inflection[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

brag

  1. imperative of brage

North Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian bregge, which derives from Proto-Germanic *brugjǭ. Cognates include West Frisian brêge.

Noun[edit]

brag f (plural bragen)

  1. (Föhr-Amrum) bridge