brag

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English braggen (to make a loud noise; to speak boastfully) of unknown origin. Possibly related to the Middle English adjective brag (prideful; spirited), which is probably of Celtic origin;[1] or from Old Norse bragr (best; foremost; poetry);[2] or through Old English from Old Norse braka (to creak).[3]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bɹæɡ/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: brag
  • Rhymes: -æɡ
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

brag (plural brags)

  1. A boast or boasting; bragging; ostentatious pretence or self-glorification.
  2. The thing which is boasted of.
    • 1634 October 9 (first performance), [John Milton], edited by H[enry] Lawes, A Maske Presented at Ludlow Castle, 1634: [], London: [] [Augustine Matthews] for Hvmphrey Robinson, [], published 1637, →OCLC; reprinted as Comus: [] (Dodd, Mead & Company’s Facsimile Reprints of Rare Books; Literature Series; no. I), New York, N.Y.: Dodd, Mead & Company, 1903, →OCLC:
      Beauty is Nature's brag.
    • 2015 October 27, Matt Preston, The Simple Secrets to Cooking Everything Better[1], Plum, →ISBN, page 192:
      You could just use ordinary shop-bought kecap manis to marinade the meat, but making your own is easy, has a far more elegant fragrance and is, above all, such a great brag! Flavouring kecap manis is an intensely personal thing, so try this version now and next time cook the sauce down with crushed, split lemongrass and a shredded lime leaf.
  3. (by ellipsis) The card game three card brag.
    • January 23 1752, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield, in Letters to His Son, published in 1774
      our mixed companies here, which, if they happen to rise above bragg and whist, infallibly stop short of every thing either pleasing or instructive

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

brag (third-person singular simple present brags, present participle bragging, simple past and past participle bragged)

  1. (intransitive) To boast; to talk with excessive pride about what one has, is able to do, or has done; often as an attempt to popularize oneself.
  2. (transitive) To boast of something.
    to brag of one's exploits, courage, or money

Synonyms[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

brag (comparative bragger, superlative braggest)

  1. Excellent; first-rate.
  2. (archaic) Brisk; full of spirits; boasting; pretentious; conceited.
    • 1633 (first performance), Ben Jonson, “A Tale of a Tub. A Comedy []”, in The Works of Beniamin Jonson, [] (Third Folio), London: [] Thomas Hodgkin, for H[enry] Herringman, E. Brewster, T. Bassett, R[ichard] Chiswell, M. Wotton, G. Conyers, published 1692, →OCLC, (please specify the act number in uppercase Roman numerals, and the scene number in lowercase Roman numerals):
    a woundy, brag young fellow

Adverb[edit]

brag (comparative more brag, superlative most brag)

  1. (obsolete) proudly; boastfully
    • 1579, Immeritô [pseudonym; Edmund Spenser], “Februarie. Aegloga Secunda.”, in The Shepheardes Calender: [], London: [] Hugh Singleton, [], →OCLC; reprinted as H[einrich] Oskar Sommer, editor, The Shepheardes Calender [], London: John C. Nimmo, [], 1890, →OCLC:
      Seest how brag yond bullock beare [] his pricked eares?

References[edit]

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2024), “brag”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.
  2. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2024), “wile”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.;
  3. ^ brag”, in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, Springfield, Mass.: G. & C. Merriam, 1913, →OCLC.

Anagrams[edit]

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse brak, related to braka (to break, crack).

Noun[edit]

brag n (singular definite braget, plural indefinite brag)

  1. bang, crash

Inflection[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

brag

  1. imperative of brage

North Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian bregge, which derives from Proto-West Germanic *bruggju. Cognates include West Frisian brêge.

Noun[edit]

brag f (plural bragen)

  1. (Föhr-Amrum) bridge

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Welsh brac, from Proto-Brythonic *brag, from Proto-Celtic *mrakis. Cognate with Irish braich.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brag m (plural bragau)

  1. malt (sprouted grain used in brewing)

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
brag frag mrag unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “brag”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies