graf

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See also: Graf and graaf

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From German Graf ‎(count).

Noun[edit]

graf ‎(plural grafs)

  1. (uncommon, now historical) A German or Austrian count.
    • 1843 February, "Graf de Tropp", in Fraser's Magazine for Town and Country, volume 27, [books.google.com/books?id=9ZUtAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA200 page 200]:
      Without ceremony, the Graf, on his entering the drawing-room, seated himself at the piano-forte, and proposed affording his new friends "a leetle example" how music was performed in Hungary.

Etymology 2[edit]

Phonetic respelling of abbreviation of paragraph.

Noun[edit]

graf ‎(plural grafs)

  1. (journalism, slang) A paragraph.

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch graf.

Noun[edit]

graf ‎(plural grafte)

  1. grave

Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

graf m

  1. graph (mathematical diagram)
  2. (graph theory) graph
  3. chart (graphical presentation)

Derived terms[edit]

External links[edit]

  • graf in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • graf in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Dutch *graf, from Proto-Germanic *grabą, *grabō ‎(grave, trench, ditch), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrābʰ- ‎(to dig, scratch, scrape). Compare Low German Graf, Graff, German Grab, West Frisian grêf, English grave, Danish grav, Icelandic gröf.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

graf n ‎(plural graven, diminutive grafje n)

  1. grave
Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From French grave ‎(serious, grave). Most likely influenced by Dutch erg which can mean "serious, grave" as well as "very". The alternative form graaf ‎(very), also slang, has the same origin and meaning, but stays closer to the original French pronunciation.

Pronunciation[edit]

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!
Particularly: “Same as above for all etymologies? If so move the Pron section above the first etymology section at L3.”

Adverb[edit]

graf

  1. (slang) very
    Dat is graf duur — That's very expensive

French[edit]

Noun[edit]

graf m ‎(plural grafs)

  1. (slang) graffiti
    L'usage du tag et du graf s'affirme d'autant plus comme un pouvoir de communication tribale constituant un code secret.

External links[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From English graph

Noun[edit]

graf m ‎(definite singular grafen, indefinite plural grafer, definite plural grafene)

  1. a graph (diagram)

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From English graph

Noun[edit]

graf m ‎(definite singular grafen, indefinite plural grafar, definite plural grafane)

  1. a graph (diagram)

References[edit]


Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

graf m inan

  1. (mathematics) graph

Declension[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Noun[edit]

graf m ‎(genitive singular grafa, plural grafaichean)

  1. graph

Derived terms[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Noun[edit]

grȁf m (Cyrillic spelling гра̏ф)

  1. (mathematics) graph
  2. (graph theory) graph

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

graf c

  1. (mathematics) graph, the set \left\{(x, F({x}))\right\}
  2. (graph theory) graph; a ordered set (V,E) of edges which joins to the vertices such that each of the edge's ends is located at a vertex
  3. obsolete spelling of grav

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

graf ‎(plural grafs)

  1. count (ruler of a county)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]