doler

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: dòler

Aragonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb[edit]

doler

  1. (transitive) to hurt

References[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dolēre, present active infinitive of doleō.

Verb[edit]

doler

  1. to hurt

Conjugation[edit]

This verb needs an inflection-table template.


Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

doler

  1. Alternative form of doldre

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin dolāre, present active infinitive of dolō.

Verb[edit]

doler

  1. to plane (cut with a plane)

Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

doler

  1. first-person singular present passive subjunctive of dolō

Old Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dolēre, present active infinitive of doleō. Gallo-Romance cognate with Old French doloir.

Verb[edit]

doler

  1. to hurt; to cause pain

Descendants[edit]

  • Catalan: doler
  • Occitan: dòler

References[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Spanish doler, from Latin dolēre, present active infinitive of doleō, from Proto-Italic *doleō (hurt, cause pain), from Proto-Indo-European *dolh₁éyeti (divide), from *delh₁- (cut).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /doˈleɾ/, [d̪oˈleɾ]

Verb[edit]

doler (first-person singular present duelo, first-person singular preterite dolí, past participle dolido)

  1. (transitive) to hurt; to ache
    me duele la cabezamy head hurts (literally, “my head is hurting me)”)
  2. (transitive) to grieve

Conjugation[edit]

  • Rule: o becomes a ue in stressed syllables.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]