doler

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See also: dòler

Aragonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Verb[edit]

doler

  1. (transitive) to hurt

References[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dolēre, present active infinitive of doleō.

Verb[edit]

doler

  1. to hurt

Conjugation[edit]

This verb needs an inflection-table template.


Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

doler

  1. Alternative form of doldre

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin dolāre, present active infinitive of dolō.

Verb[edit]

doler

  1. to plane (cut with a plane)

Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

doler

  1. first-person singular present passive subjunctive of dolō

Old Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dolēre, present active infinitive of doleō. Gallo-Romance cognate with Old French doloir.

Verb[edit]

doler

  1. to hurt; to cause pain

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Spanish doler, from Latin dolēre, present active infinitive of doleō, from Proto-Italic *doleō (hurt, cause pain), from Proto-Indo-European *dolh₁éyeti (divide), from *delh₁- (cut).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /doˈleɾ/, [d̪oˈleɾ]

Verb[edit]

doler (first-person singular present duelo, first-person singular preterite dolí, past participle dolido)

  1. (transitive) to hurt; to ache
    me duele la cabezamy head hurts (literally, “my head is hurting me)”)
  2. (transitive) to grieve

Conjugation[edit]

  • Rule: o becomes a ue in stressed syllables.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]