dolor

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: dolôr

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman dolour, mainland Old French dolor (modern douleur), from Latin dolor (pain, grief). Doublet of dol.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈdoʊlə(ɹ)/, /ˈdɒlə(ɹ)/

Noun[edit]

dolor (countable and uncountable, plural dolors)

  1. (literary) Sorrow, grief, misery or anguish.
  2. A unit of pain used to theoretically weigh people's outcomes.
    • 1986, Rosemarie Tong, Ethics in policy analysis, →ISBN:
      Supposedly, utilitarians are able to add and subtract hedons (units of pleasure) and dolors (units of pain) without any signs of cognitive or affective distress []

Synonyms[edit]

  • (unit of pain): dol

Antonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

  • (unit of pain): util

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dolor, dolōrem.

Noun[edit]

dolor m (plural dolores)

  1. pain

Related terms[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan dolor, from Latin dolor, dolōr (pain, sorrow), from Proto-Italic *dolōs, from Proto-Indo-European *dolh₁ōs, derived from the root *delh₁- (to split, divide).

Noun[edit]

dolor m or f (plural dolors)

  1. pain of a continuing nature, especially that of rheumatism
  2. sorrow or grief of a continuing nature

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Chavacano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish dolor (pain).

Noun[edit]

dolor

  1. pain; ache

Ladino[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Spanish dolor, from Latin dolor, dolōrem.

Noun[edit]

dolor f (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling דולור‎)

  1. pain

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *dolōs, from Proto-Indo-European *delh₁- (to hew, to split, verbal root).[1]

Synchronically, from doleō +‎ -or.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dolor m (genitive dolōris); third declension

  1. pain, ache, hurt
  2. anguish, grief, sorrow
  3. indignation, resentment, anger

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative dolor dolōrēs
Genitive dolōris dolōrum
Dative dolōrī dolōribus
Accusative dolōrem dolōrēs
Ablative dolōre dolōribus
Vocative dolor dolōrēs

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Asturian: dolor
  • Catalan: dol, dolor
  • Calabrese: doluri
  • English: dol, dolor, dolour
  • Esperanto: doloro
  • French: douleur
  • Friulian: dolôr

References[edit]

  • dolor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • dolor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • dolor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • time will assuage his grief: dies dolorem mitigabit
    • to soothe grief: consolari dolorem alicuius
    • to feel pain: dolore affici
    • to be vexed about a thing: dolorem capere (percipere) ex aliqua re
    • to feel acute pain: doloribus premi, angi, ardere, cruciari, distineri et divelli
    • to cause a person pain: dolorem alicui facere, afferre, commovere
    • to cause any one very acute pain: acerbum dolorem alicui inurere
    • the pain is very severe: acer morsus doloris est (Tusc. 2. 22. 53)
    • to find relief in tears: dolorem in lacrimas effundere
    • to give way to grief: dolori indulgere
    • grief has struck deep into his soul: dolor infixus animo haeret (Phil. 2. 26)
    • to be wasted with grief; to die of grief: dolore confici, tabescere
    • the pain grows less: dolores remittunt, relaxant
    • to struggle against grief: dolori resistere
    • to render insensible to pain: callum obducere dolori (Tusc. 2. 15. 36)
    • I have become callous to all pain: animus meus ad dolorem obduruit (Fam. 2. 16. 1)
    • to banish grief: dolorem abicere, deponere, depellere
    • to free a person from his pain: dolorem alicui eripere (Att. 9. 6. 4)
    • to my sorrow: cum magno meo dolore
  • dolor in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  1. ^ Meier-Brugger, Indo-European Linguistics

Occitan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan dolor, from Latin dolor, dolōrem (pain, sorrow).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dolor m or f (plural dolors)

  1. pain

Related terms[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dolor, dolōrem.

Noun[edit]

dolor m (oblique plural dolors, nominative singular dolors, nominative plural dolor)

  1. pain; suffering

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dolor, dolōrem.

Noun[edit]

dolor m or f

  1. pain

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Spanish dolor, from Latin dolōrem, accusative of dolor (pain; grief), from Proto-Italic *dolōs, from Proto-Indo-European *dolh₁ōs, derived from the root *delh₁- (to split, divide).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dolor m (plural dolores)

  1. pain, ache, aching soreness, tenderness (physical)
    dolores de crecimientogrowing pains
    dolor de espaldabackache
  2. grief
  3. sorrow, hurt, pain, suffering (emotional, mental)
  4. sore (in certain expressions)
    dolor de gargantasore throat
  5. heartache

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]