doer

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See also: dóer and dör

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English doer, doar, doere, from Old English dōere (a doer; worker), equivalent to do +‎ -er.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

doer (plural doers)

  1. Someone who does, performs, or executes; an active person, an agent.
    • 2002, Colin Jones, The Great Nation, Penguin 2003, page 295:
      Though his name was closely linked to that of Physiocrats, he was less an armchair intellectual like Quesnay or the elder Mirabeau than a doer in the vein of Bertin and Trudaine [...].
    • 2008, Aleksandra Lojek-Magdziarz, The Guardian, 25 Mar 2008:
      In schools, submission, not curiosity, was a highly valued virtue. Thinkers were out, doers were in.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Coordinate terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Adverb[edit]

doer

  1. way over there; far away
    Hulle gesels daar doer.They're talking way over there.
    Doer, anderkant die berge!Far away, on the other side of the mountains!

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese doer (13th century, Cantigas de Santa Maria), from Latin dolēre, present active infinitive of doleō, from Proto-Italic *doleō (hurt, cause pain), from Proto-Indo-European *dolh₁éyeti (divide), from *delh₁- (cut). Cognate with Portuguese doer and Spanish doler.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

doer (first-person singular present doio, first-person singular preterite doín, past participle doído)

  1. (intransitive) to ache, hurt; to cause pain
  2. (takes a reflexive pronoun) to take pity

Conjugation[edit]

References[edit]

  • doer” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • doer” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • doer” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • doer” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • doer” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From don +‎ -er.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

doer (plural doers)

  1. doer, agent (someone who does, performs, or executes)
  2. offender (criminal who commits a specified crime)
  3. (rare) cause, reason

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: doer

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

doer m or n

  1. indefinite plural of do

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese doer, from Latin doleō, from Proto-Italic *doleō (hurt, cause pain), from Proto-Indo-European *dolh₁éyeti (divide), from *delh₁- (cut).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

doer (past participle doído)

  1. (intransitive) to hurt (to be painful)
    Minha perna doía tanto que eu não conseguia andar.My leg was hurting so much that I couldn’t walk.
    Injeções doem.Injections hurt.
  2. (figuratively) to hurt; to pain (to cause emotional pain)
    Me dói ver o sofrimento dessas pessoas.It pains me to see these people’s suffering.

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

doer

  1. (literary) present subjunctive impersonal of dod
  2. (literary) imperative impersonal of dod

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
doer ddoer noer unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.