rode

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Verb[edit]

rode

  1. simple past tense of ride
  2. (now colloquial, nonstandard) past participle of ride
    • 1662, John Baxter, A Saint Or a Brute [] [1], page 26:
      No doubt many a journey you have rode and gone, and many a hard daies labour you have taken, and ſharpened perhaps with care and grief []
    • 1827 [1780], Francis Asbury, The Journal of the Rev. Francis Asbury [] [2], volume II:
      We dined at Martin's, and then came on to father Low's: we have rode but eight miles this day.
    • 2014 May 5, Eric Bogosian, 100 (monologues)[3], Theatre Communications Group, →ISBN, page 100:
      I have rode with the Kings, man, and I have rode with the best! I know what the truth is, and the truth is that I count and you don't.

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

rode (third-person singular simple present rodes, present participle roding, simple past and past participle roded)

  1. (ornithology) Of a male woodcock, to fly back and forth over the edge of a woodland while calling; to perform its, typically crepuscular, mating flight.
    • 1886, Peter Christen Asbjørnsen, H.L. Brækstad, transl., Folk and Fairy Tales, page 85:
      "When the sun rises we shall have some splendid play. Only hear the woodcock, how he is roading; he expects fine weather."

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

rode (plural rodes)

  1. (nautical) The line from a vessel to its anchor.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Noun[edit]

rode (plural rodes)

  1. Obsolete form of road.
    • 1544 October 23, Lord Evre, Letters:
      Thomas Carlysle, &c. rode a Forrey to Dunglas, and there seased and brought away 80 Nolt, 200 Shepe, 22 Naggs. A Rode made to a Stede called the Hayrebed, and there they gate 30 Nolt, 3 or 4 Naggs.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Qveene. [], part II (books IV–VI), London: [] [Richard Field] for VVilliam Ponsonby, OCLC 932900760, book VI, stanza 8, page 461:
      There dwelt a ſaluage nation, which did liue / Of ſtealth and ſpoile, and making nightly rode / Into their neighbours borders []
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, [] (King James Version), London: [] Robert Barker, [], OCLC 964384981, 1 Samuel 27:10, column 1:
      And Achiſh said, Whither haue ye made a rode to day? And Dauid said, Againſt the South of Iudah, and againſt the South of the Ierahmeelites, and againſt the South of the Kenites.

Anagrams[edit]


Alemannic German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

rode (third-person singular simple present rodt, past participle grodt, auxiliary haa)

  1. (transitive, reflexive) to move, stir
    • 1908, Meinrad Lienert, ’s Heiwili, I.5:
      Äs stoht im Stubli, rod't si nüd.

References[edit]


Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rode

  1. vocative singular of rod

Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /roːdə/, [ˈʁoːðə]

Noun[edit]

rode c (singular definite roden, plural indefinite roder)

  1. (military) file
  2. tax collector's district

Declension[edit]

Verb[edit]

rode (imperative rod, infinitive at rode, present tense roder, past tense rodede, perfect tense har rodet)

  1. to mess up (make a physical mess of)
  2. to rummage, to root

References[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rode

  1. Inflected form of rood

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Verb[edit]

rode

  1. inflection of roder:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Verb[edit]

rode

  1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of rodar

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

rode

  1. inflection of roden:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

Anagrams[edit]


Hunsrik[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

rode

  1. to guess

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

rode

  1. third-person singular present indicative of rodere

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

rōde

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of rōdō

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English rōd, from Proto-West Germanic *rōdu, from Proto-Germanic *rōdō. The final vowel is generalised from the Old English inflected forms.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rode (plural rodes or roden)

  1. A cross or gibbet.
  2. The cross of Christ.
  3. The cross as an emblem of Christianity, such as:
    1. As an emblem representing torment, suffering, or tribulation
    2. A crucifix
  4. A rod, pole, or bar
  5. A quarter of an acre; a rood
Descendants[edit]
  • English: rood
  • Scots: rude, ruid
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English rād, from Proto-West Germanic *raidu, from Proto-Germanic *raidō. The final vowel is generalised from the Old English inflected forms.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rode (plural rodes or roden)

  1. ride, journey, voyage
  2. harbour, roadstead
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old English rudu.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈrud(ə)/, /ˈroːd(ə)/

Noun[edit]

rode (plural rodes or roden)

  1. ruddiness, redness
  2. face, appearance, visage
  3. Pot marigold, calendula (Calendula officinalis)
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

From Old English ġerād, rād.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rode (plural rodes)

  1. (rare) reckoning, judgement, account
References[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rode (plural roddes)

  1. Alternative form of rodde (rod)

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse roti m, from Middle Low German.

Noun[edit]

rode f (definite singular roda, indefinite plural roder, definite plural rodene)

  1. (military) soldiers standing in a specific relation to each other in specific formations

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse roða.

Alternative forms[edit]

  • roda (a and split infinitives)

Verb[edit]

rode (present tense rodar, past tense roda, past participle roda, passive infinitive rodast, present participle rodande, imperative rode/rod)

  1. (intransitive) to shine reddish, to be red
  2. (transitive) to make red
  3. (by extension, archaic) to glaze baked goods (with raw egg yolk or milk or similar) before putting into oven

References[edit]


Pennsylvania German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare German raten, Dutch raden, English read.

Verb[edit]

rode

  1. to advise, to counsel
  2. to guess

Plautdietsch[edit]

Verb[edit]

rode

  1. to guess
  2. to advise, to suggest

Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

rode

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of rodar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of rodar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of rodar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of rodar

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Noun[edit]

rode (Cyrillic spelling роде)

  1. vocative singular of rod

Noun[edit]

rode (Cyrillic spelling роде)

  1. inflection of roda:
    1. genitive singular
    2. nominative/accusative/vocative plural

Verb[edit]

rode (Cyrillic spelling роде)

  1. third-person plural present of roditi

Venetian[edit]

Noun[edit]

rode

  1. plural of roda