waw

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See also: WAW

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English wawen, waȝien, from Old English wagian (to move, shake, swing, totter), from Proto-Germanic *wagōną (to move), from Proto-Indo-European *weǵhe- (to drag, carry). Cognate with German wagen (to venture, dare, risk), Dutch wagen (to venture, dare, also to move, stir), Swedish våga (to dare).

Verb[edit]

waw (third-person singular simple present waws, present participle wawing, simple past and past participle wawed)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To stir; move; wave.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English wawe, waȝe, waghe, from Old English wǣg (motion, water, wave, billow, flood, sea), from Proto-Germanic *wēgaz (wave, storm), from Proto-Indo-European *weǵhe- (to drag, carry). Cognate with North Frisian weage (water, wave), German Wag, Woge (wave), French vague (wave), Swedish våg (wave).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

waw (plural waws)

  1. (obsolete, water) A wave.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English wawe, wowe, waugh, wough, from Old English wāh, wāg (a wall, partition), from Proto-Germanic *waigaz (wall), from Proto-Indo-European *weyk- (to bend, twist). Cognate with Scots wauch, vauch.

Pronunciation[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • wo (Northern England, Derbyshire)
  • waugh (Scotland)

Noun[edit]

waw (plural waws)

  1. (Northern England, Scotland, dialectal) A wall.
    • 1678, John Ray, A Collection of English Proverbs, 75:
      She hath been at London to call a strea a straw, and a waw a wall.
    • 1886, Thomas Farrall, Betty Wilson's Cummerland Teals, 41:
      T'ootside waws was whitewesh't.
    • For more examples of usage of this term, see Citations:wo.

Etymology 4[edit]

From Arabic وَاو(wāw).

Noun[edit]

waw (plural waws)

  1. The twenty-seventh letter of the Arabic alphabet: و.
  2. Alternative spelling of vav
    • 2006, George Athas, The Tel Dan Inscription: A Reappraisal and a New Introduction, page 147:
      Rather, the waws of both fragments are demonstrably similar. What Cryer and Becking fail to note is that the style of waw used in Fragment B is also used in Fragment A.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Ibatan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognates with Yami awaw.

Adjective[edit]

waw

  1. thirsty

Ivatan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognates with Yami awaw.

Adjective[edit]

waw

  1. thirsty

Mapudungun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

waw (using Raguileo Alphabet)

  1. A valley.

References[edit]

  • Wixaleyiñ: Mapucezugun-wigkazugun pici hemvlcijka (Wixaleyiñ: Small Mapudungun-Spanish dictionary), Beretta, Marta; Cañumil, Dario; Cañumil, Tulio, 2008.

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

waw

  1. Alternative form of wawe

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

waw m (plural waws)

  1. Alternative spelling of uau

Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English wagian (wave, undulate).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

waw (plural waws)

  1. (water) wave