bein

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See also: Bein, be-in, and bein'

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English been, beene, bene (gracious, generous, pleasant), of unknown origin. Perhaps from Old Norse beinn (straight, right, favourable, advantageous, convenient, friendly, fair, keen), from Proto-Germanic *bainaz (straight), from Proto-Indo-European *bhei- (to hit, beat). Cognate with Scots bein, bien (in good condition, pleasant, well-to-do, cosy, well-stocked, pleasant, keen), Icelandic beinn (straight, direct, hospitable), Norwegian bein (straight, direct, easy to deal with). See also bain.

Adjective[edit]

bein (comparative more bein, superlative most bein)

  1. (Now chiefly dialectal) Wealthy; well-to-do.
    a bein farmer
  2. (Now chiefly dialectal) Well provided; comfortable; cosy.

Derived terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

bein (comparative more bein, superlative most bein)

  1. (Now chiefly dialectal) Comfortably.

Verb[edit]

bein (third-person singular simple present beins, present participle beining, simple past and past participle beined)

  1. (transitive, Scotland) To render or make comfortable; dry.

Anagrams[edit]


Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse bein, from Proto-Germanic *bainą.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bein n (genitive singular beins, plural bein)

  1. leg
  2. bone

Declension[edit]

Declension of bein
n3 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative bein beinið bein beinini
accusative bein beinið bein beinini
dative beini beininum beinum beinunum
genitive beins beinsins beina beinanna

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse bein, from Proto-Germanic *bainą.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bein n (genitive singular beins, nominative plural bein)

  1. a bone
    Hundurinn borðaði bein.
    The dog ate a bone.

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old French bien.

Adverb[edit]

bein (comparative miyeu, superlative miyeu)

  1. (Jersey) well

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse bein, from Proto-Germanic *bainą.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

bein n (definite singular beinet, indefinite plural bein, definite plural beina or beinene)

  1. a leg
  2. a bone

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse bein, from Proto-Germanic *bainą. Akin to English bone.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bein n (definite singular beinet, indefinite plural bein, definite plural beina)

  1. a leg
  2. a bone

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old Norse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *bainą. Compare Old English bān, Old Saxon and Old Frisian bēn, Old High German bein.

Noun[edit]

bein n (genitive beins, plural bein)

  1. leg
  2. bone

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • bein in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Romansch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin bene.

Adverb[edit]

bein

  1. (Sursilvan) well
  2. (Sursilvan) beautifully
  3. (Sursilvan) yes (used to disagree with a negative statement)
Alternative forms[edit]
  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) bain
  • (Sutsilvan, Surmiran) bagn

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

bein m (plural beins)

  1. (Sursilvan) farm
Alternative forms[edit]
  • (Puter, Vallader) bain
Synonyms[edit]

Scots[edit]

Verb[edit]

bein

  1. present participle of be