bain

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See also: bàin, Bain, and bain-

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English bain, bayne, bayn, beyn(direct, prompt), from Old Norse beinn(straight, right, favourable, advantageous, convenient, friendly, fair, keen), from Proto-Germanic *bainaz(straight), from Proto-Indo-European *bhei-(to hit, beat). Cognate with Scots bein, bien(in good condition, pleasant, well-to-do, cosy, well-stocked, pleasant, keen), Icelandic beinn(straight, direct, hospitable), Norwegian bein(straight, direct, easy to deal with). See also bein.

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

bain ‎(comparative more bain, superlative most bain)

  1. (Now chiefly dialectal) Ready; willing.
  2. (Now chiefly dialectal) Direct; near; short; gain.
    That is the bainest way.
  3. (Now chiefly dialectal) Limber; pliant; flexible.

Adverb[edit]

bain ‎(comparative more bain, superlative most bain)

  1. (Now chiefly dialectal) Readily; willingly.
  2. (Now chiefly dialectal) Nearby; at hand.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English bayne, baine, from Old French bain(bath), from Latin balneum(bath, bath-house).

Alternative forms[edit]

  • bane (obsolete)
  • bayne (15th-17th centuries)

Noun[edit]

bain ‎(plural bains)

  1. (obsolete) A bath.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, chapter xj, in Le Morte Darthur, book VIII:
      THus was sir Tramtryst longe there wel cherysshed / with the kynge and the quene / [] / So vpon a daye / the quene and la beale Isoud made a bayne for syre Tramtryst / And whan he was in his bayne / the quene and Isoud her doughter romed vp & doune in the chamber / and there whyles Gouernail and Heles attendyd vpon Tramtryst

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin balneum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bain m ‎(plural bains)

  1. bath

Derived terms[edit]

External links[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a conflation of Old Irish benaid(beat, strike) and boingid(break, cut).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bˠanʲ/, /bˠɪnʲ/

Verb[edit]

bain ‎(present analytic baineann, future analytic bainfidh, verbal noun baint, past participle bainte) (transitive, intransitive)

  1. extract from bed in ground, dig out; dig up (potatoes, etc.); mine (coal, etc.)
  2. separate from root, stem, etc.; reap, pick; cut (hay, turf, flowers, etc.), mow
  3. release from socket; open
  4. release from source; shed
  5. release sound; strike
  6. agitate
  7. release from hold; lift
  8. win
  9. become due

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
bain bhain mbain
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • "bain" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • benaid” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • boingid” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Romansch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin bene.

Adverb[edit]

bain

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) well
  2. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) beautifully
  3. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) yes (used to disagree with a negative statement)
Alternative forms[edit]
  • (Sursilvan) bein
  • (Sutsilvan, Surmiran) bagn
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

bain m (plural bains)

  1. (Puter, Vallader) farm
Alternative forms[edit]
Synonyms[edit]