bain

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See also: Bain and bain-

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English bain, bayne, bayn, beyn (direct, prompt), from Old Norse beinn (straight, right, favourable, advantageous, convenient, friendly, fair, keen).

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

bain (comparative more bain, superlative most bain)

  1. (now chiefly dialectal) Ready; willing.
  2. (now chiefly dialectal) Direct; near; short; gain.
    That is the bainest way.
  3. (now chiefly dialectal) Limber; pliant; flexible.

Adverb[edit]

bain (comparative more bain, superlative most bain)

  1. (now chiefly dialectal) Readily; willingly.
  2. (now chiefly dialectal) Nearby; at hand.

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English bayne, baine, from Old French bain (bath), from Latin balneum (bath, bath-house). Doublet of bagnio.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

bain (plural bains)

  1. (obsolete) A bath.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, chapter xj, in Le Morte Darthur, book VIII:
      THus was sir Tramtryst longe there wel cherysshed / with the kynge and the quene / [] / So vpon a daye / the quene and la beale Isoud made a bayne for syre Tramtryst / And whan he was in his bayne / the quene and Isoud her doughter romed vp & doune in the chamber / and there whyles Gouernail and Heles attendyd vpon Tramtryst

Anagrams[edit]


Bavarian[edit]

Noun[edit]

bain ?

  1. (Sappada, Sauris, Timau) wine

References[edit]

  • Umberto Patuzzi, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar, Luserna: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien.

Cimbrian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German wīn, from Old High German wīn, from Proto-West Germanic *wīn, from Latin vīnum. Cognate with German Wein, English wine.

Noun[edit]

bain m

  1. (Sette Comuni, Thirteen Communities) wine
    Dar bain ist och gamacht mettar baimarn.The wine is also made with grapes. (Sette Comuni dialect)

References[edit]

  • “bain” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo
  • “bain” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French, from Vulgar Latin *baneum (bath), from Latin balneum or balineum, from Ancient Greek βαλανεῖον (balaneîon). Doublet of bagne.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bɛ̃/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

bain m (plural bains)

  1. bath

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Ilocano[edit]

Noun[edit]

bain

  1. shame

Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a conflation of Old Irish benaid (beat, strike) and boingid (break, cut).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bˠanʲ/, /bˠɪnʲ/

Verb[edit]

bain (present analytic baineann, future analytic bainfidh, verbal noun baint, past participle bainte) (transitive, intransitive)

  1. extract from bed in ground, dig out; dig up (potatoes, etc.); mine (coal, etc.)
  2. separate from root, stem, etc.; reap, pick; cut (hay, turf, flowers, etc.), mow
  3. release from socket; open
  4. release from source; shed
  5. release sound; strike
  6. agitate
  7. release from hold; lift
  8. win
  9. become due

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
bain bhain mbain
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Lashi[edit]

Adverb[edit]

bain

  1. already

Noun[edit]

bain

  1. plate
  2. flower

Verb[edit]

bain

  1. finish

References[edit]


Limos Kalinga[edit]

Noun[edit]

bain

  1. shame

Adjective[edit]

bain

  1. bashful; shy

Romansch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin bene.

Adverb[edit]

bain

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) well
  2. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) beautifully
  3. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) yes (used to disagree with a negative statement)
Alternative forms[edit]
  • (Sursilvan) bein
  • (Sutsilvan, Surmiran) bagn
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

bain m (plural bains)

  1. (Puter, Vallader) farm
Alternative forms[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse bein, from Proto-Germanic *bainą.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbeɪ̯ːn/, /ˈbeɪ̯ːɳ/, /ˈbeːɳ/, /ˈbe̞ɪ̯ːɳ/, /ˈbäɪ̯ːɳ/, /ˈbɑːɳ/, /ˈbäɪ̯ːn/
    Rhymes: -éɪ̯ːn

Noun[edit]

bain n

  1. A leg.
    hava ilt i bęiɳęn, i bęiɳåm
    to have a pain in the leg, in the legs
  2. A bone.

Alternative forms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Rietz, Johan Ernst, “BAJN el. bain”, in Svenskt dialektlexikon: ordbok öfver svenska allmogespråket [Swedish dialectal lexicon: a dictionary for the Swedish lects] (in Swedish), 1962 edition, Lund: C. W. K. Gleerups Förlag, published 1862–1867, page 19