bane

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See also: Bane, bañe, bañé, and banë

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English bane, from Old English bana, from Proto-Germanic *banô (compare Old High German bano (death), Icelandic bani (bane, death)), from Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰon-on-, from the o-grade of *gʷʰen- (to strike, to kill).

Noun[edit]

bane (countable and uncountable, plural banes)

  1. A cause of misery or death; an affliction or curse
    the bane of my existence
    • Herbert
      Money, thou bane of bliss, and source of woe.
  2. (dated) Poison, especially any of several poisonous plants
  3. (obsolete) A killer, murderer, slayer
  4. (obsolete) destruction; death
    • Milton
      The cup of deception spiced and tempered to their bane.
  5. A disease of sheep; the rot.
Antonyms[edit]
  • (affliction or curse): boon
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

bane (third-person singular simple present banes, present participle baning, simple past and past participle baned)

  1. (transitive) To kill, especially by poison; to be the poison of.
  2. (transitive) To be the bane of.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English ban (northern dialect), from Old English bān.

Noun[edit]

bane (plural banes)

  1. (chiefly Scotland) bone

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bane

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of banen

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

bane

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ばね

Manx[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish bán, from Proto-Celtic *bānos (white).

Adjective[edit]

bane (plural baney, comparative baney)

  1. white, blank, pallid
    Er cabbyl bane va mee.My mount was a white horse.
    Haink daah bane yn aggle er.He blanched with fear.
  2. fair, blonde
    Shen Illiam Bane.That's fair-haired William.
  3. fallow
    Faag y magher bane.Leave the field lea.

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
bane vane mane
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • bane” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Dutch *bana, from Proto-Germanic *banō.

Noun[edit]

bāne f

  1. open field, battlefield
  2. lane, track (for playing balls)
  3. road, way, path
Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Dutch *bano, from Proto-Germanic *banô.

Noun[edit]

bāne f, m

  1. harm, pain
Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Further reading[edit]

  • bane (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929
  • bane (II)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Low German bane, compare with German Bahn

Noun[edit]

bane m (definite singular banen, indefinite plural baner, definite plural banene)

  1. a trajectory
  2. a railway line
  3. a sports field
  4. a racing track
  5. orbit (of a satellite, including the moon)

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse bani

Noun[edit]

bane m (definite singular banen, indefinite plural baner, definite plural banene)

  1. death (by murder)

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle Low German bane, compare with German bahnen.

Verb[edit]

bane (imperative ban, present tense baner, passive banes, simple past bana or banet or bante, past participle bana or banet or bant, present participle banende)

  1. to pave, as in
    bane vei for - pave the way for

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Low German bane, compare with German Bahn

Noun[edit]

bane m, f (definite singular banen or bana, indefinite plural banar or baner, definite plural banane or banene)

  1. a trajectory
  2. a railway line
  3. a sports field
  4. a racing track
  5. orbit (of a satellite, including the moon)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse bani

Noun[edit]

bane m (definite singular banen, indefinite plural banar, definite plural banane)

  1. death (by murder)

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle Low German bane

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

bane (present tense banar, past tense bana, past participle bana, passive infinitive banast, present participle banande, imperative bane/ban)

  1. to pave, as in
    bane veg for - pave the way for

References[edit]


Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English bān, from Proto-Germanic *bainą.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ben]
  • (Mid Northern Scots) IPA(key): [bin], [bein]

Noun[edit]

bane (plural banes)

  1. (anatomy) bone, limb

Derived terms[edit]


Yola[edit]

Noun[edit]

bane

  1. bone

References[edit]

  • J. Poole W. Barnes, A Glossary, with Some Pieces of Verse, of the Old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy (1867)