veg

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Shortened form of various related words including vegetable, vegetarian, and vegetate.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

veg ‎(not comparable)

  1. vegetarian
    • 2007, Tom Masters, Eastern Europe[1], Lonely Planet, ISBN 1741044766, page 120:
      The food's lip-smackingly good with some veg options, and there's a ham and eggs breakfast for 3KM.

Noun[edit]

veg ‎(plural vegs or veg)

  1. (colloquial) vegetable.
    • 2002, Tom Grahn, "Food compositions and methods of preparing the same", US Patent 6814975 [2], page 5,
      Secondary foodstuffs are exemplified by the following prepared dishes: vegetarian steaks, gratinated vegs, oven made lasagne, fish and ham with potatoes, []
    • 2004, Marion Halligan, The Taste of Memory[3], ISBN 1741143128, page 185:
      [] meals of meat and three veg were mostly the same three veg, beans peas potatoes, or peas carrots potatoes.
Usage notes[edit]
  • In colloquial speech this is usually pluralized simply as "veg."
  • In writing this may or may not be followed by a period to mark it as an abbreviation.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

veg ‎(third-person singular simple present vegges, present participle vegging, simple past and past participle vegged)

  1. (colloquial) to vegetate; to engage in complete inactivity; to rest
    After working hard all week, I decided to stay home and veg on Saturday.
    And he just sits and vegges on the TV, munches nachos, whatever.
Alternative forms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Coined in a 1948 paper in the American Journal of Psychology by Robert S. Harper and S. S. Stevens.[5], [6]

Noun[edit]

veg ‎(plural vegs)

  1. (psychology) A unit of subjective weight, equivalent to the perceived weight of lifting 100 grams.

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch vechten.

Verb[edit]

veg ‎(present veg, present participle vegtende, past participle geveg)

  1. to fight

Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse veikr, from Proto-Germanic *waikwaz.

Adjective[edit]

veg

  1. weak, yielding
Inflection[edit]
Inflection of veg
Positive Comparative Superlative
Common singular veg vegere vegest2
Neuter singular vegt vegere vegest2
Plural vege vegere vegest2
Definite attributive1 vege vegere vegeste
1) When an adjective is applied predicatively to something definite, the corresponding "indefinite" form is used.
2) The "indefinite" superlatives may not be used attributively.

Etymology 2[edit]

Non-lemma forms.

Verb[edit]

veg

  1. past tense of vige

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse vegr, from Proto-Germanic *wegaz, from Proto-Indo-European *weǵʰ-.

Noun[edit]

veg m ‎(definite singular vegen, indefinite plural veger, definite plural vegene)

  1. road
  2. way
  3. direction

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse vegr, from Proto-Germanic *wegaz, from Proto-Indo-European *weǵʰ-.

Noun[edit]

veg m ‎(definite singular vegen, indefinite plural vegar, definite plural vegane)

  1. road
  2. way
  3. direction

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Weg.

Noun[edit]

veg ‎(plural vegs)

  1. road, way

Declension[edit]