stig

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See also: Stig and stíg

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Referred to in the book Piccadilly Jim by PG Wodehouse in 1917 :

You never know what is waiting for you around the corner. You start the day with the fairest prospects, and before nightfall everything is as rocky and ding-basted as stig tossed full of doodlegammon.

Also referenced as the eponymous character in the book Stig of the Dump (Clive King, Puffin, 1963, →ISBN.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /stɪɡ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪɡ

Noun[edit]

stig (plural stigs)

  1. (UK, slang, derogatory) Someone from a poor background, with poor dress sense.

Synonyms[edit]

See chav.

Anagrams[edit]

Faroese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stig n (genitive singular stigs, plural stig)

  1. pace
  2. stair, rung
  3. (dance) step
  4. niveau, level
  5. degree (Celsius etc.)
  6. (sports) score

Declension[edit]

Declension of stig
n3 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative stig stigið stig stigini
accusative stig stigið stig stigini
dative stigi stiginum stigum stigunum
genitive stigs stigsins stiga stiganna

Synonyms[edit]

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stig n (genitive singular stigs, nominative plural stig)

  1. level
  2. degree
  3. stage
  4. point (unit of scoring in a game or competition)
  5. (baseball, cricket) run

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Irish[edit]

Adverb[edit]

stig

  1. Obsolete form of istigh.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

stig

  1. imperative of stige

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse stígr.

Noun[edit]

stig m (definite singular stigen, indefinite plural stigar, definite plural stigane)

  1. alternative form of sti

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

stig

  1. present tense of stige
  2. imperative of stige

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

stìg n (definite singular stìget, indefinite plural stìg, definite plural stìgi)

  1. (pre-1917) alternative form of steg

References[edit]

Old English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *stīgu, from Proto-Germanic *stīgō, from *stīganą (climb) ( > Old English stīgan). Cognate with Middle Dutch stige, Old High German stiga. A masculine Germanic variant *stīgaz is indicated by Old High German stic (German Steig), Old Norse stígr (Swedish stig).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /stiːɡ/, [stiːɣ]

Noun[edit]

stīg f (nominative plural stīga or stīge)

  1. path (especially steep or narrow)
Declension[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Middle English: stiȝhe, styȝe, stighe, stieghe, stie, stye, sty

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *stiją. Cognate with Old Norse stí (Danish sti).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stiġ n

  1. hall, building, sty
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Middle English: sty

Old Norse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Related to stíga. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun[edit]

stig n

  1. step, pace
  2. step (of a ladder)
  3. (plural only) degree, rank

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • stig”, in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Swedish[edit]

en stig

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Swedish stīgher, from Old Norse stígr, from Proto-Germanic *stīgu- or Proto-Germanic *stīgi-. Cognate with Danish sti and German Steig. Related to Swedish stiga. See also Old English stig.

Noun[edit]

stig c

  1. a path, a trail (in nature and narrow)
    • 1968, “Deirdres samba [Deirdre's samba]”, Cornelis Vreeswijk (lyrics), Chico Buarque (music), performed by Cornelis Vreeswijk:
      Varje kväll vid åttatiden, går jag stigen nerför berget. Och så hoppar jag på bussen, som går till Copacabana. Jag har badat, jag har duschat. Luktar gott om hela kroppen. Och så börjar jag gå, och jag tål att tittas på.
      Every evening around eight o'clock, I walk the path down the mountain. And then I jump on the bus, that goes to Copacabana. I have bathed, I have showered. My whole body smells good. And then I start walking, and I bear being looked at [idiomatic for looking good].
Declension[edit]
Declension of stig 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative stig stigen stigar stigarna
Genitive stigs stigens stigars stigarnas

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

stig

  1. imperative of stiga

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]