boon

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See also: bon, Boon, and bo-on

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English boon (prayer), from Old Norse bón (prayer, petition), from Proto-Germanic *bōniz (supplication), influenced by boon (good, favorable, adj). Doublet of ben; see there for more.

Noun[edit]

boon (plural boons)

  1. (obsolete) A prayer; petition.
    • (Can we find and add a quotation of Edmund Spenser to this entry?):
      For which to God he made so many an idle boon []
  2. (archaic) That which is asked or granted as a benefit or favor; a gift or benefaction.
    • 1881, The Bible (English Revised Version), James 1:17:
      Every good gift and every perfect boon is from above []
    • 1872, James De Mille, The Cryptogram:[1]
      I gave you life. Can you not return the boon by giving me death, my lord?
  3. A good thing; a blessing or benefit; a thing to be thankful for.
    • 2013 July-August, Catherine Clabby, “Focus on Everything”, in American Scientist:
      Not long ago, it was difficult to produce photographs of tiny creatures with every part in focus. [] A photo processing technique called focus stacking has changed that. Developed as a tool to electronically combine the sharpest bits of multiple digital images, focus stacking is a boon to biologists seeking full focus on a micron scale.
    Finding the dry cave was a boon to the weary travellers.
    Anaesthetics are a great boon to modern surgery.
  4. (Britain dialectal) An unpaid service due by a tenant to his lord.
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English boon, bone, borrowed from Old Northern French boon, from Old French bon (good), from Latin bonus (good), from Latin duonus, dvenos, from Proto-Indo-European *dū- (to respect).

Adjective[edit]

boon (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Good; prosperous.
    boon voyage
  2. Kind; bountiful; benign.
    • John Milton
      Which [] Nature boon / Poured forth profuse on hill, and dale, and plain.
  3. Now only in boon companion: gay; merry; jovial; convivial.
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English bone (North), akin to or alteration of Old English bune (reed).[1]

Noun[edit]

boon (uncountable)

  1. The woody portion of flax, separated from the fiber as refuse matter by retting, braking, and scutching.
Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Random House Webster's Unabridged Dictionary, s.v. ‘boon3’ (NY: Random House, 2001).

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch boon, from Middle Dutch bône, from Old Dutch *bōna, from Proto-Germanic *baunō.

Noun[edit]

boon (plural bone, diminutive boontjie)

  1. bean

Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch bône, from Old Dutch *bōna, from Proto-Germanic *baunō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

boon f or m (plural bonen, diminutive boontje n)

  1. bean

Hypernyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Afrikaans: boon
  • Papiamentu: bonchi (from the diminutive)
  • Sranan Tongo: bonki (from the diminutive)

Middle English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Old Norse bón, from Proto-Germanic *bōniz.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

boon (plural boons or boonen)

  1. prayer, supplication, request
  2. boon, bonus
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English bān.

Noun[edit]

boon (plural boons)

  1. Alternative form of bon

Etymology 3[edit]

Borrowed from Old Northern French boon, from Old French bon (good).

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

boon

  1. good

Descendants[edit]