boon

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See also: boon- and Boon

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /buːn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːn

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English boon (prayer), from Old Norse bón (prayer, petition), from Proto-Germanic *bōniz (supplication), influenced by boon (good, favorable, adj). Doublet of ben; see there for more.

Noun[edit]

boon (plural boons)

  1. A good thing; a blessing or benefit; a thing to be thankful for.
    Finding the dry cave was a boon to the weary travellers.
    Anaesthetics are a great boon to modern surgery.
    • 2013 July–August, Catherine Clabby, “Focus on Everything”, in American Scientist[1], volume 100, number 4, archived from the original on 2013-09-07:
      Not long ago, it was difficult to produce photographs of tiny creatures with every part in focus. [] A photo processing technique called focus stacking has changed that. Developed as a tool to electronically combine the sharpest bits of multiple digital images, focus stacking is a boon to biologists seeking full focus on a micron scale.
    • 2023 July 21, Patrick Kingsley, “What’s Reasonable? A Debate Over a High Court’s Reach Divides Israel.”, in The New York Times[2], New York, N.Y.: The New York Times Company, →ISSN, →OCLC, archived from the original on 2023-07-25:
      Supporters of the measure, which Parliament is expected to vote on next Monday, present it as a boon for democracy: a modest limit on the ways in which an elected government can be stymied by unelected judges, who will in any case still have other tools to overrule ministers.
    • 2023 October 11, Jonathan Cook, “Israel-Palestine war: The blood of Gaza is on the West’s hands as much as Israel’s”, in Middle East Eye[3]:
      President Joe Biden has declared - approvingly - that a “long war” is ahead between Israel and Hamas. Washington seems to relish long wars, which always prove a boon to its arms industries and a distraction from domestic troubles.
  2. (archaic) That which is asked or granted as a benefit or favor; a gift or benefaction.
  3. (obsolete) A prayer; petition.
  4. (Britain, dialectal) An unpaid service due by a tenant to his lord.
  5. (Hindu mythology) A blessing, typically a supernatural power, granted to an ascetic by a god or goddess.
    • 2007, Klaus Klostermaier, A Survey of Hinduism: Third Edition, New York: State University of New York Press, page 38:
      A telling story is that of Vikra, who, after practicing severe tapas for many years, called on Śiva, asking him to grant the boon that whosoever's head he would touch, that person would die instantly.
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English boon, bone, borrowed from Old Northern French boon, from Old French bon (good), from Latin bonus (good), from Old Latin duonus, dvenos, from Proto-Indo-European *dū- (to respect).

Adjective[edit]

boon (comparative booner, superlative boonest)

  1. (now only in boon companion) Gay; merry; jovial; convivial.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book IX”, in Paradise Lost. [], London: [] [Samuel Simmons], [], →OCLC; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, →OCLC, lines 791-794:
      Greedily ſhe ingorg’d without restraint, / And knew not eating Death: Satiate at length, / And hight’nd as with Wine, jocond and boon, / Thus to herſelf ſhe pleaſingly began.
    • 1712, Humphry Polesworth [pseudonym; John Arbuthnot], “How the Guardians of the Deceas’d Mrs. Bull’s Three Daughters Came to John, and What Advice They Gave Him; wherein in Briefly Treated the Characters of the Three Daughters: Also John Bull’s Answer to the Three Guardians”, in John Bull in His Senses: Being the Second Part of Law is a Bottomless-Pit. [], Edinburgh: [] James Watson, [], →OCLC, page 30:
      I knovv the Infirmity of our Family; vve are apt to play the Boon-Companion, and throvv avvay our Money in our Cups: []
    • 1848 November – 1850 December, William Makepeace Thackeray, “In or Near the Temple Garden”, in The History of Pendennis. [], volume II, London: Bradbury and Evans, [], published 1850, →OCLC, page 110:
      I’m a lonely old man; I lead a life that I don’t like, among boon companions, who make me melancholy.
    • 1922 February, James Joyce, “[Episode 16: Eumaeus]”, in Ulysses, Paris: Shakespeare and Company, [], →OCLC, part III [Nostos], page 576:
      ―No, Mr Bloom repeated again, I wouldn’t personally repose much trust in that boon companion of yours who contributes the humorous element, Dr Mulligan, as a guide, philosopher, and friend, if I were in your shoes.
    • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt, 1st American edition, New York, N.Y.: Grove Press, published 1959, →OCLC:
      [T]he boon twins Art and Con aged thirty-seven years []
    • 1985, Herbert Kretzmer (English lyrics), Les Misérables (musical), "Master of the House," second and third refrains, fifth line:
      (2) "Everybody's boon companion, / Everybody's chaperon"; (3) "Everybody's boon companion: / Give[s] 'em everything he's got"
  2. (archaic) Kind; bountiful; benign.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book IV”, in Paradise Lost. [], London: [] [Samuel Simmons], [], →OCLC; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, →OCLC, lines 239-243:
      With mazie error under pendant ſhades / Ran Nectar, viſiting each plant, and fed /Flours worthy of Paradiſe which not nice Art / In Beds and curious Knots, but Nature boon / Powrd forth profuſe on Hill and Dale and Plaine, / []
  3. (obsolete) Good; prosperous.
    boon voyage
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English bone (reed, stem, husk), akin to or alteration of Old English bune (reed; drinking cup).[1]

Noun[edit]

boon (uncountable)

  1. The woody portion of flax, separated from the fiber as refuse matter by retting, braking, and scutching.
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Noun[edit]

boon (plural boons)

  1. (slang) Clipping of sheboon.

References[edit]

  1. ^ boon, n.3”, in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present, reproduced from Stuart Berg Flexner, editor in chief, Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2nd edition, New York, N.Y.: Random House, 1993, →ISBN.

Anagrams[edit]

Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch boon, from Middle Dutch bône, from Old Dutch *bōna, from Proto-Germanic *baunō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

boon (plural bone, diminutive boontjie)

  1. bean

Descendants[edit]

  • Xhosa: imbotyi (from the diminutive)

Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch bône, from Old Dutch *bōna, from Proto-Germanic *baunō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

boon f or m (plural bonen, diminutive boontje n)

  1. bean

Hypernyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Old Norse bón, from Proto-Germanic *bōniz.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

boon (plural boons or boonen)

  1. prayer, supplication, request
  2. boon, bonus
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Old Northern French boon, from Old French bon (good).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

boon

  1. good
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

boon (plural boons)

  1. Alternative form of bon