favor

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See also: Favor

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English favour, favor, faver, from Anglo-Norman favour, from mainland Old French favor, from Latin favor (good will; kindness; partiality), from faveō (to be kind to), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂weh₁yeti (to be favourable to), from the root Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂- (to shine, glow light). Respelled in American English to more closely match its Latin etymon. Compare also Danish favør (favor), Irish fabhar (favor), from the same Romance source.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈfeɪvɚ/
    • (file)
    • (file)
  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfeɪvə/
  • Rhymes: -eɪvə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: fa‧vor

Noun[edit]

favor (countable and uncountable, plural favors) (American spelling, alternative in Canada)

  1. A kind or helpful deed; an instance of voluntarily assisting (someone).
    He did me a favor when he took the time to drive me home.
  2. Goodwill; benevolent regard.
    She enjoyed the queen's favor.
    to fall out of favor
  3. A small gift; a party favor.
    At the holiday dinner, the hosts had set a favor by each place setting.
    A marriage favour is a bunch or knot of white ribbons or white flowers worn at a wedding.
  4. Mildness or mitigation of punishment; lenity.
  5. The object of regard; person or thing favoured.
  6. (obsolete) Appearance; look; countenance; face.
  7. (law) Partiality; bias[1]
  8. (archaic) A letter, a written communication.
    • 1748, Samuel Richardson, Clarissa, Letter 68:
      I will now take some notice of your last favour; but being so far behind-hand with you, must be brief.
  9. (obsolete) Anything worn publicly as a pledge of a woman's favor.
  10. (obsolete) A ribbon or similar small item that is worn as an adornment, especially in celebration of an event.
    • 1853 May, E.R. Bowen, “Bride-Maids and Bride-Cake”, in Peterson's Magazine, volume 23, number 5, page 306:
      The bride favors, or true love knots, ancient symbols of love, faith, and friendship, pointing out the indisssoluble tie of affection and duty, did not, as might be supposed, take their name of true love knots from the words "true" and "love,", but from the Danish verb "Trulofa," that is, "I plight my troth of faith." These knots were formerly distributed in great abundance; were worn in the hats by gentlemen, and consisted of variously colored ribbons, which were chosen by the bride and her maids, sometimes after long and serious discussions.
    • 1898, Melvin Ballou Gilbert, The Director - Volume 1, page 210:
      Of all the new war cotillion favors yet devised there is hardly anything more novel than these. Aigrettes that are bunches of ribbons, red, white and blue, designed to be pinned in the hair at once, make up another favor.
    • 1900, “From Abroad”, in The International, volume 8, page 415:
      Since the good news young folk—and old, too, for that matter—bedeck themselves with favors. Charms hand pendent from the watch chain, from neck pins.
    • 1991, Anthony G. Barrand, Six Fools and a Dancer: The Timeless Way of the Morris, page 178:
      We can and should borrow choice items, such as bell pads, favors and flowered hats , which can easily be adapted []
    • 2013, R. Turner Wilcox, The Mode in Hats and Headdress, page 109:
      [] honor was bestowed upon the latter because he was the proud possessor of luxurious blond hair and had the most beautiful single curl tied with a ribbon. The lovelock was thereafter called a cadcnettc and the ribbon bowknots, favors.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Favor is the standard US spelling, and an alternative in Canada. Favour is the standard spelling in Canada and outside North America.
  • English speakers usually "do someone a favor" (rather than *"make them a favor", which would be sense 3 only). See Appendix:Collocations of do, have, make, and take for uses and meaning of favor collocated with these words.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

favor (third-person singular simple present favors, present participle favoring, simple past and past participle favored) (US, alternative in Canada, transitive)

  1. To look upon fondly; to prefer.
    • 1611, Luke 1:28, King James version
      And the angel came in unto her, and said, Hail, thou that art highly favored, the Lord is with thee: blessed art thou among women.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 6, in The China Governess[1]:
      Even in an era when individuality in dress is a cult, his clothes were noticeable. He was wearing a hard hat of the low round kind favoured by hunting men, and with it a black duffle-coat lined with white.
    • 2007, Bert Casper, Shadow Upon the Dream: Book 1: Barrûn, page 537:
      [] alone, without having to favor his right, uninjured leg, []
  2. To encourage, conduce to
    • 1927, Havelock Ellis, Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 2 (of 6)[2]:
      These [boys being groomed as prostitutes] are sold by their parents (sometimes stolen from them), about the age of 4, and educated, while they are also subjected to a special physical training, which includes massage of the gluteal regions to favor development, dilatation of the anus, and epilation (which is not, however, practised by Chinese women).
  3. To do a favor [noun sense 1] for; to show beneficence toward.
    Would you favor us with a poetry reading?
  4. To treat with care.
    Favoring your sore leg will only injure the other one.
  5. (in dialects, including Southern US and Louisiana) To resemble; especially, to look like (another person).
    • 1970, Donald Harington, Lightning Bug:
      ‘Mandy?’ he said, and stared at the girl. ‘Don't favor her too much.’ ‘Favors her dad,’ Latha said, and looked at him.
    • 1989, Rayford Clayton Reddell, ‎Robert Galyean, Growing Fragrant Plants (page 13)
      [] chamomile and apples? Those particular smellalikes tested our imagination. Yet much of what he said was right on the mark. The scent of sweet peas, for instance, does indeed favor that of wisteria.
    • 2012, Rick Bass, A Thousand Deer: Four Generations of Hunting and the Hill Country, →ISBN, page 63:
      The way things repeat themselves, across time — not just in the replications and recombinations of family and place ("He favors his momma, she favors her daddy"), but in the accretion of like patterns []

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

References[edit]

  1. ^ 1839. John Bouvier, Law Dictionary

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin favor, attested from the 14th century.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

favor m or f (plural favors)

  1. favour

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ favor”, in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana, 2022

Further reading[edit]


Kabuverdianu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese favor.

Noun[edit]

favor

  1. favour
  2. pleasure

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From faveō (I am well disposed or inclined toward, favor, countenance, befriend) +‎ -or.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

favor m (genitive favōris); third declension

  1. good will, inclination, partiality, favor
    Synonym: beneficium
    Antonyms: maleficium, iniūria, dētrīmentum, noxa, calamitās
  2. support

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative favor favōrēs
Genitive favōris favōrum
Dative favōrī favōribus
Accusative favōrem favōrēs
Ablative favōre favōribus
Vocative favor favōrēs

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • favor”, in Charlton T[homas] Lewis; Charles [Lancaster] Short (1879) [] A New Latin Dictionary [], New York, N.Y.; Cincinnati, Ohio; Chicago, Ill.: American Book Company; Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  • favor”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • favor in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • favor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[3], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to be favoured by Fortune; to bask in Fortune's smiles: fortunae favore or prospero flatu fortunae uti (vid. sect. VI. 8., note uti...)
    • to find favour with some one; to get into their good graces: benevolentiam, favorem, voluntatem alicuius sibi conciliare or colligere (ex aliqua re)
    • popular favour; popularity: aura favoris popularis (Liv. 22. 26)
    • popular favour; popularity: populi favor, gratia popularis
  • favor” in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

favor

  1. Alternative form of favour

Norn[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse faðir (father) + vár (our), from Proto-Germanic *fadēr + *unseraz, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr. Compare Shetlandic fy vor.

Noun[edit]

favor

  1. (Orkney) our father

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin favor.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

favor f (plural favors)

  1. favor

Derived terms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin favor (favour; good will), from faveō (I favour), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰoweh₁ (to notice).

Pronunciation[edit]

 

  • Hyphenation: fa‧vor
  • Rhymes: -oɾ, -oʁ

Noun[edit]

favor m (plural favores)

  1. favour (instance of voluntarily assisting someone)
  2. favour; goodwill (benevolent regard)
    Synonyms: (obsolete) favorança, graça, mercê

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

favor (not comparable)

  1. (before a verb in the infinitive) please (seen on warnings and the like)
    Favor não pisar na grama.
    Please don't step on the grass.

Romanian[edit]

Noun[edit]

favor n (plural favoruri)

  1. Alternative form of favoare

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin favor (genitive singular favōris).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /faˈboɾ/, [faˈβ̞oɾ]
  • Hyphenation: fa‧vor

Noun[edit]

favor m (plural favores)

  1. favor/favour
    Hazme un favor.
    Do me a favour.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Venetian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Italian favore

Noun[edit]

favor m (plural favuri)

  1. favour