sabotage

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See also: Sabotage

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From French sabotage.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sabotage (usually uncountable, plural sabotages)

  1. A deliberate action aimed at weakening someone (or something, a nation, etc) or preventing them from being successful, through subversion, obstruction, disruption, and/or destruction.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

sabotage (third-person singular simple present sabotages, present participle sabotaging, simple past and past participle sabotaged)

  1. To deliberately destroy or damage something in order to prevent it from being successful.
    The railway line had been sabotaged by enemy commandos.
    Our plans were sabotaged.
    • 2014 October 18, Paul Doyle, “Southampton hammer eight past hapless Sunderland in barmy encounter”, in The Guardian[1]:
      Five minutes later, Southampton tried to mount their first attack, but Wickham sabotaged the move by tripping the rampaging Nathaniel Clyne, prompting the referee, Andre Marriner, to issue a yellow card. That was a lone blemish on an otherwise tidy start by Poyet’s team – until, that is, the 12th minute, when Vergini produced a candidate for the most ludicrous own goal in Premier League history.
    • 2021 December 29, Drachinifel, The USN Pacific Submarine Campaign - The Dark Year (Dec'41 - Dec'42)[2], archived from the original on 19 July 2022, retrieved 27 July 2022, 21:03 from the start:
      The only amusing highlight was Gudgeon having managed to exploit U.S. codebreaking efforts to ambush and destroy the submarine I-173, albeit not for the lack of the Mark 14's trying to sabotage the effort, as the torpedo that had hit the sub had refused to detonate; it seemed, however, that the car-crash levels of kinetic energy involved in the dud simply ramming the sub had nonetheless done enough to fatally damage it.

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Chambers Dictionary, 9th Ed., 2003
  2. ^ sabotage”, in Collins English Dictionary.

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French sabotage.

Noun[edit]

sabotage c (singular definite sabotagen, plural indefinite sabotager)

  1. sabotage

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French sabotage.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /saːboːˈtaːʒə/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: sa‧bo‧ta‧ge
  • Rhymes: -aːʒə

Noun[edit]

sabotage m (uncountable)

  1. sabotage

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Indonesian: sabotase

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From saboter +‎ -age.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sabotage m (plural sabotages)

  1. sabotage

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French sabotage.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sabotage n

  1. sabotage

Declension[edit]

Declension of sabotage 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative sabotage sabotaget sabotage sabotagen
Genitive sabotages sabotagets sabotages sabotagens

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]