been

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See also: Been

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

been

  1. past participle of be
  2. (obsolete) plural simple present of be
    • 1584, George Peele, The Arraignment of Paris, I, ii
      My love is fair, my love is gay,
      As fresh as been the flowers in May;
    • c. 1608, William Shakespeare, Pericles, Prince of Tyre, II
      Where when men been, there's seldom ease;
    • 1641, Ben Jonson, The Sad Shepherd, I, iii
      O Friar, those are faults that are not seen,
      Ours open, and of worse example been.
    • 1686, Edward Fairfax, transl., Godfrey of Bulloigne: Or, The Recovery of Jerusalem[1], 20, page 8:
      Some of green Boughs their slender Cabbins frame, / Some lodged were Tortoſa's streets about, / Of all the Hoſt the Chief of Worth and Name / Aſſembled been, a Senate grave and ſtout;
  3. (Southern US) infinitive of be

Noun[edit]

been

  1. (Britain dialectal) plural of bee

References[edit]

Vaux, Bert and Scott Golder. 2003. The Harvard Dialect Survey: been. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Linguistics Department.

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Afrikaans Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia af

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch been, from Middle Dutch bêen, from Old Dutch bēn, from Proto-Germanic *bainą.

Noun[edit]

been (plural bene or beendere, diminutive beentjie)

  1. leg
  2. bone

Usage notes[edit]

  • The plural beendere is used alternatively in the sense “bone”, especially collectively.

Derived terms[edit]


Basque[edit]

Noun[edit]

been

  1. genitive plural of be

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch bêen, from Old Dutch bēn, from Proto-Germanic *bainą.

Noun[edit]

been n (plural benen, diminutive beentje n)

  1. leg, limb of a person, horse (other animals' would have poten) and certain objects (again many have poten)
    De benen van een passer.The legs of a pair of compasses.
  2. (mathematics) side, leg
    De benen van een hoek.The sides of an angle.
Usage notes[edit]
  • The contemporary plural benen is derived from an analogy to other nouns with regular plurals. Originally, been was left unchanged in the plural; such use in preserved only in set phrases like op de been (upright, standing, awake).

Noun[edit]

been n (plural beenderen or benen, diminutive beentje n)

  1. bone, constituent part of a skeleton.
  2. (uncountable) bone, the chalky material bones are made of
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Afrikaans: been

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

been

  1. first-person singular present indicative of benen
  2. imperative of benen

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch Low Saxon[edit]

Noun[edit]

been

  1. leg

See also[edit]

  • German Low German: Been

Finnish[edit]

Noun[edit]

been

  1. genitive/accusative singular of bee

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch bēn, from Proto-Germanic *bainą.

Noun[edit]

bêen n

  1. leg
  2. foot
  3. bone

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative forms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From a conflation of Old English bēon and wesan, from Proto-Germanic *beuną and *wesaną, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰewHeti and a conflation of *h₂wéseti and *h₁ésti.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

been (third-person singular simple present is, present participle beinge, first-/third-person singular past indicative was, past participle been)

  1. to be
    • 1382, John Wycliffe, translation of the Bible (John 1:48)
      Bifor that Filip clepide thee, whanne thou were vndur the fige tree, Y saiy thee.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 1407, The Testimony of William Thorpe, pages 40–41
      [] Filip of Repintoun whilis he was a chanoun of Leycetre, Nycol Herforde, dane Geffrey of Pikeringe, monke of Biland and a maistir dyuynyte, and Ioon Purueye, and manye other whiche weren holden rightwise men and prudent []
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
Conjugation[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French and Medieval Latin, from Arabic بَان(bān, ben tree).

Noun[edit]

been

  1. ben (moringa tree)
Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old English bēon, nominative plural form of bēo, from Proto-Germanic *bijōniz, nominative plural form of *bijǭ.

Noun[edit]

been

  1. plural of bee (bee)

Etymology 4[edit]

From Old English ġebēon, past participle of bēon (to be); equivalent to y- +‎ be +‎ -en.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

been

  1. past participle of been
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

From (with the replaced with an -n leveled in from the past and subjunctive) Old English bēoþ, present plural of bēon (to be), from Proto-Germanic *biunþi, third-person present plural of *beuną (to be, become).

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

been

  1. Plural present indicative form of been
Usage notes[edit]

The usual plural form of been is aren in the North, been in the Midlands, and beth in the South; sind also existed, especially early on, but was not the predominant form in any area.

Descendants[edit]
  • English: been (obsolete as the plural)

Etymology 6[edit]

From Old English bēon, present subjunctive plural of bēon (to be), from Proto-Germanic *biwīn, third-person present subjunctive plural of *beuną (to be, become).

Verb[edit]

been

  1. Plural present subjunctive form of been
Descendants[edit]
  • English: be
  • Scots: be

Etymology 7[edit]

Noun[edit]

been (plural beenes or beenen)

  1. Alternative form of bene (bean)

Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English ybeen, from Old English ġebēon, past participle of bēon (to be).

Verb[edit]

been

  1. past participle of be