were

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See also: were- and we're

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English were, weren, from Old English wǣre, wǣron, wǣren, from Proto-Germanic *wēz-, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wes-. More at was.

Pronunciation[edit]

stressed

unstressed

Verb[edit]

were

  1. Second-person singular simple past tense indicative of be.
    John, you were the only person to see him.
  2. First-person plural simple past tense indicative of be.
    We were about to leave.
  3. Second-person plural simple past tense indicative of be.
    Mary and John, you were right.
  4. Third-person plural simple past tense indicative of be.
    They were a fine group.
    They were to be the best of friends from that day on.
  5. Simple imperfect subjunctive in all persons of be.
    I wish that it were Sunday.
    I wish that I were with you.
    • with "if" omitted, put first in an "if" clause:
      Were it simply that she wore a hat, I would not be upset at all. (= If it were simply...)
      Were father a king, we would have war. (= If father were a king,...)
    • 2011 November 3, David Ornstein, “Macc Tel-Aviv 1 - 2 Stoke”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      Maccabi would have been out of contention were it not for Stoke's profligacy, but their fortune eventually ran out as the visitors opened the scoring.
  6. (Northern England) was.
Synonyms[edit]
  • (second-person singular past indicative, archaic) wast (used with "thou")
  • (second-person singular imperfect subjunctive, archaic) wert (used with "thou")

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English were, wer, from Old English wer, from Proto-Germanic *weraz, from Proto-Indo-European *wiHrós (man). Cognate with Latin vir (man).

Noun[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

were (plural weres)

  1. (archaic) man (human male), as in were wolf (man-wolf).
    • 1857, Alexandre Dumas, The Wolf Leader:
      "Ah! Madame!" they said, "what is the use, what can we do against a were wolf?"
    • 1912, Frederic Jesup Stimson, Popular Law-making, ISBN 1465556796:
      But these modern statutes in Ohio and the Southern States, making towns responsible in a definite sum to the kin of a murdered man, are the exact re-enactment of the early Anglo-Saxon law; except that the blood damages -- the were gild--- were in those days put upon the neighbors or the kin of the enemy.
    • 2009, Ferran Alexandri, The Big Book Of Fantastic Creatures, ISBN 8120749138, page 19:
      They say that a person turns into a were wolf when he is bitten by another lycanthrope, or even by an ordinary wolf.
  2. (obsolete) A fine for slaying a man; weregild.
    • Bosworth
      Every man was valued at a certain sum, which was called his were.
    • 2004, James Fitzjames Stephen, A General View of the Criminal Law of England, ISBN 1584774789, page 12-13:
      The consequence of conviction was, the payment to the person injured, of a were, or penalty, proportioned to the offencel but though this was the ordinary course, the recovery of the were was not the only object of the proceedings. "The were," says Reeve, "in cases of homicide, and the fines that were paid in cases of theft of various kinds, were only to redeem the offender from the proper punishment of the law, which was death, and that was reddemable, not only by paying money, but by undergoing some personal pains; hence it is that we hear a great variety of corporal punishments..."...
  3. (fandom slang) The collective name for any kind of person that changes into another form under certain conditions, including the werewolf.
Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

were

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of weren

Anagrams[edit]


Irarutu[edit]

were

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Central Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wahiʀ.

Noun[edit]

were

  1. water (clear liquid H₂O)

Kurdish[edit]

Verb[edit]

were

  1. Second-person singular imperative of hatin.

Maku'a[edit]

Noun[edit]

were

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Aone van Engelenhoven, The position of Makuva among the Austronesian languages of Southwest Maluku and East Timor, in Austronesian historical linguistics and culture history: a festschrift, Pacific linguistics 601 (2009)

Mwani[edit]

Noun[edit]

were class 5 (plural mawere)

  1. breast

Onin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Central Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wahiʀ.

Noun[edit]

were

  1. water (clear liquid H₂O)

Toro[edit]

Noun[edit]

were

  1. day

Reference[edit]


Uruangnirin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Central Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wahiʀ.

Noun[edit]

were

  1. water (clear liquid H₂O)