bist

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See also: bîst and bīst

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English bist, beest, best, from Old English bist ("(thou) art"; second person singular of bēon (to be)), from Proto-Germanic *biusi ((thou) art), equivalent to be +‎ -est. Cognate with West Frisian bist ((thou) art), Low German büst ((thou) art), German bist ((thou) art).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bist

  1. (Britain dialectal, Bristol, West Country, Northern England) Originally used to form the second person singular of be, but can denote other present tense forms, such as: are, am, is
    • 1875, Mark Lemon, Henry Mayhew, Tom Taylor, Punch:
      Thee bist rayther too much a feelosofer, I be afeard, for me.
    • 1904, Henry Branch, Cotswold and vale:
      Lookee, thee bist purty, my love; lookee, thee bist purty: thee hast dove's eyes betwix thy locks; thy locks be like a flock o' ship fur thickedness.
    Where bist goin'.
    Where are you going?
    I bist goin' 'ome.
    I am going home
    How bist?
    How are you?

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German bist. Cognate to Middle Dutch bes, best[1], dialectal English bist, beest.

German bist has two sources:

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bɪst/
  • (file)

Verb[edit]

bist

  1. second-person singular present of sein
    Du bist nicht mein Sohn.
    You are not my son.

References[edit]

  1. ^ A. van Loey, Schönfeld's Historische Grammatica van het Nederlands, 8. druk 1970, →ISBN; §147a
  2. ^ Kluge, Friedrich (1989) , “bin”, in Elmar Seebold, editor, Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache [Etymological dictionary of the German language] (in German), 22nd edition, →ISBN

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English bist ("(thou) art"; second person singular of bēon (to be)), from Proto-Germanic *biusi ((thou) art), equivalent to been +‎ -est.

Verb[edit]

bist

  1. Second-person singular present indicative form of been

Usage notes[edit]

This form is less common than art for the second-person singular.

Descendants[edit]

  • English: bist, beest (archaic or dialectal)

Old English[edit]

Verb[edit]

bist

  1. second-person singular present of bēon

Wakhi[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Tajik бист (bist).

Numeral[edit]

bist

  1. twenty

West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Latin bēstia.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bist n (plural bisten, diminutive bistje or bistke)

  1. animal, beast
    De bisten binne fuort.The animals are gone.

Alternative forms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • beest”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Yagnobi[edit]

Numeral[edit]

bist

  1. twenty

Further reading[edit]

  • Ronald Emmerick, Iranian, in Indo-European Numerals (1992, →ISBN, edited by Jadranka Gvozdanovic), page 312