cotta

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See also: čotta and Cotta

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From medieval Latin cotta (clerical tunic).

Noun[edit]

cotta (plural cottas)

  1. A surplice, in England and America usually one shorter and less full than the ordinary surplice and with short sleeves, or sometimes none.
    • 1978, Jane Gardam, God on the Rocks, Abacus 2014, p. 131:
      ‘The confidence of the very rich,’ thought Father Carter watching Binkie shaking out albs and cottas and calling rather loudly to the organist.
  2. A kind of coarse woollen blanket.

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

cotta f (plural cotte)

  1. surplice, cassock, tabard
  2. crush (infatuation)
  3. batch (for a kiln or oven)

Derived terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cotta f

  1. feminine of cotto

Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Proto-Germanic *kuttô (cowl, woolen cloth, coat).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cotta f (genitive cottae); first declension[1][2][3]

  1. undercoat, tunic

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative cotta cottae
genitive cottae cottārum
dative cottae cottīs
accusative cottam cottās
ablative cottā cottīs
vocative cotta cottae

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Blaise, Albert (1975), “cota”, in Dictionnaire latin-français des auteurs du moyen-âge: lexicon latinitatis medii aevi (Corpus christianorum) (in Latin, French), Turnhout: Brepols, page 259
  2. ^ Niermeyer, Jan Frederik (1976), “cottus”, in Mediae Latinitatis Lexicon Minus (in Latin), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 278
  3. ^ du Cange, Charles (1883), “cotta”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre