cote

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Cote, coté, côte, côté, and Côte

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From the Old English cote, the feminine form of cot (small house); doublet of cot (in the sense of “cottage”) and more distantly related to cottage. Cognate to Dutch kot.

Noun[edit]

cote (plural cotes)

  1. A cottage or hut.
  2. A small structure built to contain domesticated animals such as sheep, pigs or pigeons.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book 4”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker [] [a]nd by Robert Boulter [] [a]nd Matthias Walker, [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554:
      Watching where shepherds pen their flocks, at eve, / In hurdled cotes.
Synonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See quote.

Verb[edit]

cote (third-person singular simple present cotes, present participle coting, simple past and past participle coted)

  1. (obsolete) To quote.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Nicholas Udall to this entry?)

Etymology 3[edit]

Probably related to French côté (side) via Middle French.

Verb[edit]

cote (third-person singular simple present cotes, present participle coting, simple past and past participle coted)

  1. To go side by side with; hence, to pass by; to outrun and get before.
    A dog cotes a hare.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for cote in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Late Latin quota, from Latin quotus

Noun[edit]

cote f (plural cotes)

  1. call number
  2. ratings, popularity, approval rating (of a politician)
  3. (architecture) dimension
  4. (finance, stock market) quote
  5. (horse racing, gambling) odds
  6. (finance) tax assessment

Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Inflected forms

Verb[edit]

cote

  1. first-person singular present indicative of coter
  2. third-person singular present indicative of coter
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of coter
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of coter
  5. second-person singular imperative of coter

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cōtem, accusative of cōs.

Noun[edit]

cote f (plural coti)

  1. sharpening stone
  2. hone

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cōte

  1. ablative singular of cōs

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French cote, cotte, from Latin cotta, from Proto-Germanic *kuttô.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cote (plural cotes)

  1. A coat, especially one worn as an undergarment or a base layer.
  2. A coat or gown bearing somebody's heraldic symbols.
  3. A coating or external layer; that which surrounds the outside of something.
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • English: coat
  • Scots: coat
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Unknown; probably related to Dutch koet.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cote (plural cootes)

  1. coot (Fulica atra)
  2. seagull (bird of the family Laridae)
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Noun[edit]

cote m

  1. definite singular of rev (Etymology 1)

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Noun[edit]

cote m

  1. definite singular of rev (Etymology 1)

Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

cote f (oblique plural cotes, nominative singular cote, nominative plural cotes)

  1. Alternative form of cotte

Old Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

co (how) +‎ de (from it)

Pronunciation[edit]

Particle[edit]

cote

  1. of what sort is…?
  2. what is…?
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 12c36
      Cote mo thorbe-se dúib mad [a]mne labrar?
      What do I profit you pl (lit. ‘what is my profit to you’) if it be thus that I speak (subj.)?

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
cote chote cote
pronounced with /ɡ(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

cote

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of cotar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of cotar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of cotar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of cotar