quote

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Recorded since 1387 “to mark (a book) with chapter numbers or marginal references”, from Old French coter, from Medieval Latin quotare ‎(to distinguish by numbers, number chapters), itself from Latin quotus ‎(which, what number (in sequence)), from quot ‎(how many) and related to quis ‎(who). The sense developed via “to give as a reference, to cite as an authority” to “to copy out exact words” (since 1680); the business sense “to state the price of a commodity” (1866) revives the etymological meaning. The noun, in the sense of “quotation,” is attested from 1885; see also usage note, below.

Pronunciation[edit]

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Noun[edit]

quote ‎(plural quotes)

  1. A quotation, statement attributed to someone else.
  2. A quotation mark.
  3. A summary of work to be done with a set price.
    After going over the hefty quotes, the board decided it was cheaper to have the project executed by its own staff.
  4. A price set for a financial security or commodity.

Usage notes[edit]

Until the late 19th century, quote was exclusively used as a verb. Since then, it has been used as a shortened form of either quotation or quotation mark; see etymology, above. This use as a noun is well-understood and widely used, although it is often rejected in formal and academic contexts.[1]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

quote ‎(third-person singular simple present quotes, present participle quoting, simple past and past participle quoted)

  1. (transitive) To repeat someone’s exact words.
  2. (transitive) To prepare a summary of work to be done and set a price.
  3. (Commerce, transitive) To name the current price, notably of a financial security.
  4. (intransitive) To indicate verbally or by equivalent means the start of a quotation.
  5. (archaic) To observe, to take account of.
    • 1598, John Marston, “Satyre IV”, in The Metamorphosis of Pigmalions Image, and Certaine Satyres, poem:
      But must our moderne Critticks envious eye
      Seeme thus to quote some grosse deformity?
    • 1600, Shakespeare, Hamlet:
      That hath made him mad.
      I am sorry that with better heed and judgment
      I had not quoted him. I fear'd he did but trifle …
    • 1606, John Day, The Isle of Gulls:
      I prethe doe, twill be a sceane of mirth
      For me to quote his passions and his smiles,
      His amorous haviour, …

Synonyms[edit]

  • (repeat words): cite

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rosenheim, Edward W.; Ann Batko. (2004) When Bad Grammar Happens to Good People: How to Avoid Common Errors in English. Career Press, Franklin Lakes, NJ. p. 207 ISBN 1-56414-722-3

French[edit]

Verb[edit]

quote

  1. first-person singular present indicative of quoter
  2. third-person singular present indicative of quoter
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of quoter
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of quoter
  5. second-person singular imperative of quoter

Anagrams[edit]

See also[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

quote f

  1. plural of quota

Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

quote

  1. vocative masculine singular of quotus