estimate

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin aestimatus, past participle of aestimō, older form aestumo (to value, rate, esteem); from Old Latin *ais-temos (one who cuts copper), meaning one in the Roman Republic who mints money. See also the doublet esteem, as well as aim.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛstɨmɨt/ (noun)
  • (file)
  • IPA(key): /ˈɛstɨˌmeɪ̪t/ (verb)
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

estimate (plural estimates)

  1. A rough calculation or assessment of the value, size, or cost of something.
  2. (construction and business) A document (or verbal notification) specifying how much a job is likely to cost.
    • 1928, Lawrence R. Bourne, chapter 3, in Well Tackled![1]:
      “They know our boats will stand up to their work,” said Willison, “and that counts for a good deal. A low estimate from us doesn't mean scamped work, but just that we want to keep the yard busy over a slack time.”
  3. An upper limitation on some positive quantity.
    • 1992, Louis de Branges, “The convergence of Euler functions”, in Journal of Functional Analysis[2], page 185:
      The desired norm estimate is now obtained from the identity... [referring to an earlier statement saying that a certain norm is less than or equal to a certain expression]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

estimate (third-person singular simple present estimates, present participle estimating, simple past and past participle estimated)

  1. To calculate roughly, often from imperfect data.
    • 1965, Ian Hacking, Logic of Statistical Inference[3]:
      I estimate that I need 400 board feet of lumber to complete a job, and then order 350 because I do not want a surplus, or perhaps order 450 because I do not want to make any subsequent orders.
    • 2003, Alexander J. Field, Gregory Clark, William A. Sundstrom, Research in Economic History[4]:
      Higher real prices for durables are estimated to have reduced their consumption per capita by 1.09% in 1930, ...
  2. To judge and form an opinion of the value of, from imperfect data.
    • 1691, [John Locke], Some Considerations of the Consequences of the Lowering of Interest, and Raising the Value of Money. [], London: [] Awnsham and John Churchill, [], published 1692, OCLC 933799310:
      It is by the weight of silver, and not the name of the piece, that men estimate commodities and exchange them.
    • (Can we date this quote by J. C. Shairp and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      It is always very difficult to estimate the age in which you are living.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

estimate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of estimare
  2. second-person plural imperative of estimare
  3. feminine plural of estimato