hone

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Hone, honě, Hōne, and høne

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English hon (whetstone), from Old English hān, from Proto-Germanic *hainō (compare Dutch heen, Norwegian hein), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱeh₃i- (to sharpen) (compare Ancient Greek κῶνος (kônos, cone), Persian سان(sân, whetstone)).

Noun[edit]

hone (plural hones)

  1. A sharpening stone composed of extra-fine grit used for removing the burr or curl from the blade of a razor or some other edge tool.
  2. A machine tool used in the manufacture of precision bores.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

hone (third-person singular simple present hones, present participle honing, simple past and past participle honed)

  1. To sharpen with a hone; to whet.
  2. To use a hone to produce a precision bore.
  3. To refine or master (a skill).
  4. To make more acute, intense, or effective.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Cognate with Icelandic hnúður. Distantly related to knot.

Noun[edit]

hone (plural hones)

  1. A kind of swelling in the cheek.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

French hogner (to grumble), which could be a cross of honnir (to disgrace, shame) and grogner (to grunt).

Verb[edit]

hone (third-person singular simple present hones, present participle honing, simple past and past participle honed)

  1. (UK, US, Southern US, dialect) To grumble.
    • c. 1515–1516, published 1568, John Skelton, Againſt venemous tongues enpoyſoned with ſclaunder and falſe detractions &c.:
      Such tunges ſhuld be torne out by the harde rootes,
      Hoyning like hogges that groynis and wrotes.
  2. (UK, US, Southern US, dialect) To pine, lament, or long.

Etymology 4[edit]

Interjection[edit]

hone

  1. Synonym of alas Used to express sorrow, or grief
    • 1836, Joanna Baillie, Witchcraft, Act 4, page 141
      Oh, hone! oh, hone! miserable wretch that I am! Do ye mak confession for me, Sir, and I'll say 't after you, as weel as I dow. Oh, hone! oh, hone!

Cimbrian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German honec, honic, from Old High German honag, honeg, from Proto-West Germanic *hunag, from Proto-Germanic *hunagą. Cognate with German Honig, English honey.

Noun[edit]

hone m

  1. (Luserna) honey
    süaz azpi dar honeas sweet as honey

References[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

hone

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ほね

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English hān, from Proto-Germanic *hainō (whetstone).

Noun[edit]

hone

  1. hone (whetstone)
Alternative forms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • English: hone
  • Scots: hone

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Probably of Celtic origin; see Old Irish oidid (to lend). Compare also Old Irish úan, ón (loan, lending) (Irish uain (loan, time, leisure)), Scottish Gaelic on, oin (loan, laziness).

Noun[edit]

hone (uncountable)

  1. (Northern, North Midland) delay, hesitation
Alternative forms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Yola[edit]

Noun[edit]

hone

  1. Alternative form of hoane
    • 1867, OBSERVATIONS BY THE EDITOR:
      F. brone, eelone, hone, lone, sthone, sthrone.
      E. brand, island, hand, land, stand, strand.

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 14