colmo

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See also: colmó and colmò

Galician[edit]

a Galician palloza house, with thatched roof (teito de colmo)

Etymology[edit]

13th century. Probably from Latin culmus (thatch), although the open stressed vowel found in some regions and the derived term colmea (beehive) suggest the influence of a pre-Roman substrate of Iberia *kŏlmos; ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ḱolh₂mos.[1] Cognate with Asturian cuelmu.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɔlmo̝/, /ˈkolmo̝/

Noun[edit]

colmo m (plural colmos)

  1. thatch (usually the stalks of rye and wheat)
    • 1408, José Luis Novo Cazón (ed.), El priorato santiaguista de Vilar de Donas en la Edad Media (1194-1500). A Coruña: Fundación Barrié, page 318:
      que façades a dicta metade da dicta casa de pedra e de madeyra e de giestas e de colmo
      you should build that half house with stone and wood and brooms and thatch
  2. a sheaf (of straw)
  3. a thatched roof

Derived terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

colmo m (feminine singular colma, masculine plural colmos, feminine plural colmas)

  1. spiky (when referred to the hair)
    Synonyms: colmaceiro, colmeiro

References[edit]

  • colmo” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • colmo” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • colmo” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • colmo” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.
  1. ^ Coromines, Joan; Pascual, José A. (1991–1997) , “cuelmo”, in Diccionario crítico etimológico castellano e hispánico (in Spanish), Madrid: Gredos

Italian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From colmare.

Adjective[edit]

colmo (feminine singular colma, masculine plural colmi, feminine plural colme) (di)

  1. full (of)

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin culmen, from Proto-Italic *kolamen, from Proto-Indo-European *kelH-. Possibly influenced by cumulus or culmus phonetically. Compare Spanish colmo. Doublet of the borrowed culmine.

Noun[edit]

colmo m (plural colmi)

  1. summit, top, acme
  2. height
  3. limit
  4. ridge

Verb[edit]

colmo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of colmare

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin culmus, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱolh₂mos.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

colmo m (plural colmos)

  1. (uncountable) cane (slender flexible stem of plants such as bamboo)
  2. (countable, botany) reed (hollow stem)
    Synonym: cana
  3. thatch (straw for covering roofs or stacks)

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

colmo

  1. first-person singular (eu) present indicative of colmar
    Eu colmo o telhado.
    I thatch the roof.

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cumulus, following metathesis and syncopation, according to the Real Academia Española[1] and other sources[2]. Doublet of cúmulo.

Adjective[edit]

colmo (plural colmos)

  1. summit, top
  2. height

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Noun[edit]

colmo m (plural colmos)

  1. the extreme of a situation
    Esto es el colmo. ¡Me largo!
    This is too much. I'm gone!
    Ya has llegado al colmo con tu actitud.
    You've already crossed the line with your attitude.
    para colmo (de males)to cap/top it all
    Y para colmo de males, no nos han pagado en dos meses tampoco.
    And to make it worse, they haven't paid us for two months either.

Verb[edit]

colmo

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of colmar.

References[edit]