tumulus

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin tumulus (mound, hill), from tumeō (I swell). Doublet of tombolo.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

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Wikipedia

tumulus (plural tumuli)

  1. (archaeology) A mound of earth, especially one placed over a prehistoric tomb; a barrow.
    • 1826, Mary Shelley, The Last Man, part 2, chapter 1:
      They planted the cannon on the tumuli, sole elevations in this level country, and formed themselves into column and hollow square.
    • 1898, Ernest Rhys, “The Lament for Urien from the Herbest”, in Welsh Ballads:
      The delicate white body will be covered to-day,
      The tumulus be reared, the green sod give way:
      And there, oh Cynvarch, thy son they will lay.
    • 2004, Douglas Keister, Stories in Stone, Gibbs Smith, →ISBN, OCLC 53045242, page 14:
      The tumulus is one of mankind's oldest burial monuments, dating back to 4,000 to 5,000 years B.C. [] Examples of tumuli can be seen peppering the landscape all over Western Europe.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From tumeō (I swell). Cognates include Ancient Greek τύμβος (túmbos, swell).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tumulus m (genitive tumulī); second declension

  1. A heap of earth, mound, hill, knoll, hillock.
  2. A barrow, grave, tumulus.

Declension[edit]

Second-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative tumulus tumulī
Genitive tumulī tumulōrum
Dative tumulō tumulīs
Accusative tumulum tumulōs
Ablative tumulō tumulīs
Vocative tumule tumulī

Alternative forms[edit]

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Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Catalan: túmul
  • English: tumulus
  • French: tumulus
  • Italian: tombolo, tumulo

References[edit]