ranking

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: ránking

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ranking

  1. present participle of rank

Adjective[edit]

ranking (comparative more ranking, superlative most ranking)

  1. (in combination) Having a specified rank.
  2. Superior in rank.
    • 1990, Robert Christgau, Christgau's Record Guide: The '80s (page 48)
      But neither leader nor followers give up the rhythms or reasons of a ranking MC, and I'm grieved to report that only “Kick Out the Jams” overcomes the formlessness of personality his detractors have always charged him with — []
    • 2002, Stephen Tanner, Afghanistan: A Military History from Alexander the Great to the War against the Taliban, page 176
      Eldred Pottinger was now the ranking political officer and had negotiated—at the insistence of the army's officers—an unmolested passage to Jalalabad.

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

ranking (plural rankings)

  1. One’s relative placement in a list.

Descendants[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English ranking.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ranking m inan

  1. ranking
    Synonym: gradacja

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

adjective

Further reading[edit]

  • ranking in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • ranking in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English ranking.

Noun[edit]

ranking m (plural rankings)

  1. ranking
    Synonym: classificação

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English ranking.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈrankin/, [ˈrãŋ.kĩn]

Noun[edit]

ranking m (plural rankings)

  1. ranking
    Synonym: clasificación

Usage notes[edit]

According to Royal Spanish Academy (RAE) prescriptions, unadapted foreign words should be written in italics in a text printed in roman type, and vice versa, and in quotation marks in a manuscript text or when italics are not available. In practice, this RAE prescription is not always followed.

Further reading[edit]