familia

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See also: Familia and família

Translingual[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin familia.

Noun[edit]

familia

  1. (taxonomy) A rank in a taxonomic classification, above both genus and species.
  2. (taxonomy) A taxon at this rank.

Asturian[edit]

Asturian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ast

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin familia.

Noun[edit]

familia f (plural families)

  1. family

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

familio +‎ -a (suffix indicating an adjective).

Adjective[edit]

familia (accusative singular familian, plural familiaj, accusative plural familiajn)

  1. familial; family (attributively)

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin familia.

Noun[edit]

familia f (plural familias)

  1. family

Interlingua[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

familia (plural familias)

  1. family

Ladin[edit]

Noun[edit]

familia f (plural families)

  1. family

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

For *famulia, from famulus (servant, slave) (with i < u due to l-exilis, i.e. l before i).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

familia f (genitive familiae); first declension

  1. family (various senses, see usage notes)
  2. household
    Synonyms: domus

Usage notes[edit]

According to Richard Saller, “[f]amilia was never used to mean ‘father, mother and children’ in our sense of ‘family’ today. It did have a technical, legal usage akin to ‘family’, but in common parlance most often meant ‘slave staff’, exclusive of the master's family.... The usual word for ‘family’ in the classical period was domus, which carried the general sense of ‘household’ including domestic slaves.” Saller, Richard, Slavery and the Roman Family, in Finley, Moses I., ed., Classical Slavery (London: Frank Cass, cloth 1987 & 2000 (same ed.), reprinted 1999 ISBN 0-7146-3320-8, p. 84.

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative familia familiae
genitive familiae familiārum
dative familiae familiīs
accusative familiam familiās
ablative familiā familiīs
vocative familia familiae

The older genitive singular familiās is preserved in the term pater familiās and also occurs after filius, mater, and filia.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • familia in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • familia in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “familia”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • familia” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • a sect, school of thought: schola, disciplina, familia; secta
    • a theatrical company: familia, grex, caterva histrionum
    • a band, troupe of gladiators under the management of a lanista: familia gladiatoria (Sest. 64. 134)
  • familia in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • familia in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

familia f (plural familias)

  1. Obsolete spelling of família

Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

familia f

  1. definite singular nominative and accusative form of familie.

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin familia.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

familia f (plural familias)

  1. family (nuclear family)
  2. family (grouping of things possessing common characteristics)

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Swahili[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin familia.

Noun[edit]

familia (n class, plural familia)

  1. family
  2. (taxonomy) family