genial

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See also: génial

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle French génial, from Latin geniālis (of or pertaining to marriage; festive, genial), from genius (guardian spirit) + -ālis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

genial (comparative more genial, superlative most genial)

  1. Friendly and cheerful.
  2. (especially of weather) Pleasantly mild and warm.
  3. Marked by genius.
    • Hare
      Men of genius have often attached the highest value to their less genial works.
    • 2003, Laura Fermi, Gilberto Bernardini, Galileo and the Scientific Revolution, Courier Dover Publications, page 111 [1]:
      About fifty years later, in 1675, the Danish astronomer Ole Roemer (1644-1710) had the genial idea of using astronomical rather than terrestrial distances.
  4. (archaic) Contributing to, or concerned in, propagation or production; generative; procreative; productive.
  5. (obsolete) Belonging to one's genius or natural character; native; natural; inborn.
    • Sir Thomas Browne
      natural incapacity and genial indisposition
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Ancient Greek γένειον (géneion, chin) + -al.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

genial (not comparable)

  1. (anatomy) Relating to the chin; genian.

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin geniālis.

Adjective[edit]

genial (masculine and feminine plural genials)

  1. genius
  2. brilliant, great

Derived terms[edit]

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German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

genial (comparative genialer, superlative am genialsten)

  1. genius, ingenious, genial (in the sense of genius)

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin genialis

Adjective[edit]

genial (neuter singular genialt, definite singular and plural geniale)

  1. ingenious, brilliant

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References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin genialis

Adjective[edit]

genial (neuter singular genialt, definite singular and plural geniale)

  1. ingenious, brilliant

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Adjective[edit]

genial m, f (plural geniais, comparable)

  1. genial (marked by genius)
  2. genius (very clever)

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin geniālis (of or pertaining to marriage; festive, genial), from genius (guardian spirit) + -ālis.

Adjective[edit]

genial (plural geniales)

  1. splendid, gorgeous, great
  2. ingenious
  3. genial, pleasant

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]