fresco

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See also: Fresco

English[edit]

A fresco in Toledo, Spain.

Etymology[edit]

From Italian fresco, from Medieval Latin friscus, from Proto-Germanic *friskaz. Doublet of fresh.

Pronunciation[edit]

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Noun[edit]

fresco (countable and uncountable, plural frescos or frescoes)

  1. (countable) A cool, refreshing state of the air; coolness, duskiness, shade.
    • 1779, Matthew Prior, “Hans Carvel”, in The Poetical Works of Matthew Prior: [], in Two Volumes, volume I, London: Printed for W[illiam] Strahan, [], OCLC 491256769, page 124:
      [] I [Satan] cannot ſtay / Flaring in ſun-ſhine all the day: / For, entre nous, we helliſh ſprites, / Love more the freſco of the nights; []
  2. (countable, painting) An artwork made by applying water-based pigment to wet or fresh lime mortar or plaster.
  3. (uncountable, painting) The technique used to make such an artwork.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

fresco (third-person singular simple present frescoes, present participle frescoing, simple past and past participle frescoed)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To paint using fresco.

Translations[edit]

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Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Italian fresco, from Medieval Latin friscus, from Proto-Germanic *friskaz, whence also Dutch vers and fris.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: fres‧co

Noun[edit]

fresco n (plural fresco's, diminutive frescootje n)

  1. fresco

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

13th century. From a Western Germanic language, either directly or through Vulgar Latin friscus, from Proto-Germanic *friskaz, whence also English fresh.[1]

Fresco, as a painting technique, was taken from Italian fresco.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fresco m (plural frescos, feminine fresca, feminine plural frescas)

  1. (uncountable) cool moderate or refreshing state of cold
  2. (uncountable, femenine) cool in the morning or in the evening (during the summer)
  3. (painting) fresco

Related terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fresco m (feminine singular fresca, masculine plural frescos, feminine plural frescas)

  1. fresh, recent, young, rested
    • 1295, Ramón Lorenzo (ed.), La traducción gallega de la Crónica General y de la Crónica de Castilla. Ourense: I.E.O.P.F., p. 657:
      Et cada dia, depoys que esto fezo, parouse sua cara et seu corpo mays fresco
      And everyday, after doing this, his face and his body were younger
    • 1434, M. Lucas Alvarez & M. J. Justo Martín (eds.), Fontes documentais da Universidade de Santiago de Compostela. Pergameos da serie Bens do Arquivo Histórico Universitario (Anos 1237-1537). Santiago: Consello da Cultura Galega, page 350:
      E non enperqua o "septe rogo", que se borrou estando fresquo, que paresçe que foy raydo
      and [whoever reads this text] don't mistrust the "septe rogo", because it faded when fresh, although it looks as it was deleted
  2. untransformed, not artificiality preserved (meat, fish)
    • 1291, Enrique Cal Pardo (ed.), Colección diplomática medieval do arquivo da catedral de Mondoñedo. Santiago: Consello da Cultura Galega, p. 79:
      La quartillos de salgada et xx quartillos de fresca [...] et disso que da fresca marmara iiii quartillos ao salgar
      50 quarters of salted [fish] and 20 quarters of fresh [fish] [...] and he said that the fresh one diminished 4 quarter after salting
  3. cool (temperature)
  4. impertinent

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  • fresco” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • fresc” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • fresco” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • fresco” in Santamarina, Antón (dir.), Ernesto González Seoane, María Álvarez de la Granja: Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega (v 4.0). Santiago: ILG.
  • fresco” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.
  1. ^ Coromines, Joan; Pascual, José A. (1991–1997). Diccionario crítico etimológico castellano e hispánico. Madrid: Gredos, s.v. fresco.

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Medieval Latin friscus, frescus, from Lombardic frisc, from Proto-Germanic *friskaz, from Proto-Indo-European *preysk-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fresco (feminine singular fresca, masculine plural freschi, feminine plural fresche)

  1. fresh
  2. cool
  3. wet, fresh (of paint)
    Antonym: asciutto

Noun[edit]

fresco m (plural freschi)

  1. coolness, freshness, cool
  2. light wool material
  3. (informal) cooler (prison)
    stare al frescoto be in the cooler

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese fresco, from Medieval Latin frescus, friscus, from Germanic *frisk, Proto-Germanic *friskaz, from Proto-Indo-European *preysk-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fresco m (feminine singular fresca, masculine plural frescos, feminine plural frescas, comparable)

  1. fresh (new or clean)
  2. (of plant material) fresh (of produce, not from storage)
  3. cool (having a slightly low temperature)
  4. (slang) fussy (tending to complain about petty details)

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Medieval Latin friscus, frescus, from Germanic *frisk, Proto-Germanic *friskaz, from Proto-Indo-European *preysk-.

Adjective[edit]

fresco (feminine singular fresca, masculine plural frescos, feminine plural frescas)

  1. fresh
  2. cool (temperature)
  3. cheeky
    Synonym: insolente

Noun[edit]

fresco m (plural frescos)

  1. (weather) strong breeze
  2. fresco (painting)

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]