loco

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See also: locò

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Italian

Adverb[edit]

loco ‎(not comparable)

  1. (music) A direction in written or printed music to return to the proper pitch after having played an octave higher or lower.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Spanish loco ‎(insane, crazy), from loco ‎(loose). From Arabic لَوَق ‎(lawaq, foolishness) or Ancient Greek γλαυκός ‎(glaukós, clear).

Adjective[edit]

loco ‎(comparative more loco, superlative most loco)

  1. (colloquial) crazy
    • 2003, The New Yorker, 15 Dec 2003, p.56
      You know, I’m a little loco. Kinda crazy, zany guy.
  2. (western US) intoxicated by eating locoweed
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

loco ‎(plural locos)

  1. Certain species of Astragalus or Oxytropis, capable of causing locoism.
Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

loco ‎(third-person singular simple present locos, present participle locoing, simple past and past participle locoed)

  1. (transitive) To poison with the loco plant; to affect with locoism.
  2. (transitive, colloquial, by extension) To render insane.
    • W. D. Howells
      the locoed novelist

Etymology 3[edit]

Abbreviation of locomotive.

Noun[edit]

loco ‎(plural locos)

  1. (rail transport, informal) a locomotive
Mostly used in India and surrounding South Asian countries
  1. (Can we find and add a quotation of Rudyard Kipling to this entry?)
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Noun[edit]

loco ‎(plural locos)

  1. Place, location.

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin locus, from Old Latin stlocus, from Proto-Indo-European *stel- ‎(to put, place, locate).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɔ.ko/, [ˈl̺ɔːko]
  • Hyphenation: lò‧co

Noun[edit]

loco m ‎(plural lochi)

  1. (poetic) Archaic form of luogo.

Verb[edit]

loco

  1. first-person singular present indicative of locare

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From locus ‎(place, location).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

locō ‎(present infinitive locāre, perfect active locāvī, supine locātum); first conjugation

  1. I put, place, set.
  2. I arrange, establish.
  3. I lease, hire out, lend.

Inflection[edit]

   Conjugation of loco (first conjugation)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present locō locās locat locāmus locātis locant
imperfect locābam locābās locābat locābāmus locābātis locābant
future locābō locābis locābit locābimus locābitis locābunt
perfect locāvī locāvistī locāvit locāvimus locāvistis locāvērunt, locāvēre
pluperfect locāveram locāverās locāverat locāverāmus locāverātis locāverant
future perfect locāverō locāveris locāverit locāverimus locāveritis locāverint
passive present locor locāris, locāre locātur locāmur locāminī locantur
imperfect locābar locābāris, locābāre locābātur locābāmur locābāminī locābantur
future locābor locāberis, locābere locābitur locābimur locābiminī locābuntur
perfect locātus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect locātus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect locātus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present locem locēs locet locēmus locētis locent
imperfect locārem locārēs locāret locārēmus locārētis locārent
perfect locāverim locāverīs locāverit locāverīmus locāverītis locāverint
pluperfect locāvissem locāvissēs locāvisset locāvissēmus locāvissētis locāvissent
passive present locer locēris, locēre locētur locēmur locēminī locentur
imperfect locārer locārēris, locārēre locārētur locārēmur locārēminī locārentur
perfect locātus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect locātus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present locā locāte
future locātō locātō locātōte locantō
passive present locāre locāminī
future locātor locātor locantor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives locāre locāvisse locātūrus esse locārī locātus esse locātum īrī
participles locāns locātūrus locātus locandus
verbal nouns gerund supine
nominative genitive dative/ablative accusative accusative ablative
locāre locandī locandō locandum locātum locātū

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Noun[edit]

locō

  1. dative masculine singular of locus
  2. ablative masculine singular of locus

References[edit]

  • loco in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • loco in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • loco in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) heights, high ground: loca edita, superiora
    • (ambiguous) rough and hilly ground: loca aspera et montuosa (Planc. 9. 22)
    • (ambiguous) level country; plains: loca plana or simply plana
    • (ambiguous) uncultivated districts: loca inculta
    • (ambiguous) deserts: loca deserta (opp. frequentia)
    • (ambiguous) pleasant districts; charming surroundings: loca amoena, amoenitas locorum
    • (ambiguous) to be favourably situated: opportuno loco situm or positum esse
    • (ambiguous) distant places: loca longinqua
    • (ambiguous) to leave a place: discedere a, de, ex loco aliquo
    • (ambiguous) to leave a place: egredi loco; excedere ex loco
    • (ambiguous) to quit a place for ever: decedere loco, de, ex loco
    • (ambiguous) not to stir from one's place: loco or vestigio se non movere
    • (ambiguous) to treat as one's own child: aliquem in liberorum loco habere
    • (ambiguous) my position is considerably improved; my prospects are brighter: res meae meliore loco, in meliore causa sunt
    • (ambiguous) how are you getting on: quo loco res tuae sunt?
    • (ambiguous) at this point the question arises: hoc loco exsistit quaestio, quaeritur
    • (ambiguous) our (not noster) author tells us at this point: scriptor hoc loco dicit
    • (ambiguous) Cicero says this somewhere: Cicero loco quodam haec dicit
    • (ambiguous) to set an ambuscade: insidias collocare, locare (Mil. 10. 27)
    • (ambiguous) to place some one in ambush: aliquem in insidiis locare, collocare, ponere
    • (ambiguous) to dwell in a certain place: domicilium (sedem ac domicilium) habere in aliquo loco
    • (ambiguous) to contract for the building of something: opus locare
    • (ambiguous) to give, undertake a contract for building a house: domum aedificandam locare, conducere
    • (ambiguous) of high rank: summo loco natus
    • (ambiguous) of illustrious family: nobili, honesto, illustri loco or genere natus
    • (ambiguous) of humble, obscure origin: humili, obscuro loco natus
    • (ambiguous) from the lowest classes: infimo loco natus
    • (ambiguous) a knight by birth: equestri loco natus or ortus
    • (ambiguous) to occupy a very high position in the state: in altissimo dignitatis gradu collocatum, locatum, positum esse
    • (ambiguous) to receive tenders for the construction of temples, highroads: locare aedes, vias faciendas (Phil. 9. 7. 16)
    • (ambiguous) to let out public works to contract: locare opera publica
    • (ambiguous) to reconnoitre the ground: loca, regiones, loci naturam explorare
    • (ambiguous) to occupy the high ground: occupare loca superiora
    • (ambiguous) to encamp: castra ponere, locare
    • (ambiguous) in a favourable position: idoneo, aequo, suo (opp. iniquo) loco
    • (ambiguous) to drive the enemy from his position: loco movere, depellere, deicere hostem (B. G. 7. 51)
    • (ambiguous) to abandon one's position: loco excedere

Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

loco

  1. first-person singular (eu) present indicative of locar

Spanish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Andalusian Arabic [script needed] ‎(lawqa). Compare Portuguese louco.

Adjective[edit]

loco m ‎(feminine singular loca, masculine plural locos, feminine plural locas)

  1. crazy, insane, mad (asserting that something is out of place in the head).
    David está muy loco
    David's really crazy.
  2. rash, risky, imprudent
  3. tremendous, terrific, huge, enormous
  4. overgrown, rambling
  5. loose (pipe fittings, pulley)
  6. sexy (only with "ser" ex. soy loco)
Synonyms[edit]

Noun[edit]

loco m ‎(plural locos, feminine loca)

  1. (pejorative) A crazy person.
  2. A highly affected homosexual; fruit.
  3. A plant in the genus Astragalus or Oxytropis.

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Mapudungun

Noun[edit]

loco m ‎(plural locos)

  1. (Chile) Chilean edible gastropod mollusk resembling abalone but is, in fact, a muricid (Concholepas concholepas)
Synonyms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]