loc

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See also: LoC, LOC, loc., lóc, lŏć, lọc, lộc, Lộc, and lốc

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Clipping of dreadlock.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

loc (plural locs)

  1. (informal, usually in the plural) A dreadlock.
    • 2020 May 17, Helaine R. Williams, “LET'S TALK: Cutting 'locs good lesson in fulfillment”, in Arkansas Democrat-Gazette[1]:
      Thinning hair can be especially disconcerting when one is trying to wear 'locs, also known as dreadlocks, which I'd first begun in late 2001. [] I finally fetched the shears and, cringing, cut off each 'loc at the point where new growth was coming in.
    • 2021, Nadia E. Brown, Danielle Casarez Lemi, Sister Style: The Politics of Appearance for Black Women Political Elites, New York, NY: Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 25:
      Locs are another protective hairstyle that dates back to Africa. This rope-like hairstyle is achieved by matting the hair. Priests of the Ethiopian Coptic religion in 500 BCE wore locs, and the first archaeological evidence of locs comes from East Africa.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

loc (countable and uncountable, plural locs)

  1. Alternative letter-case form of LOC.

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

loc (plural locs)

  1. (software engineering, translation studies) Clipping of localization.

Etymology 4[edit]

Adjective[edit]

loc (comparative more loc, superlative most loc)

  1. (slang) Clipping of loco (crazy).
Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *lātjā, from the same root as lot (teardrop).[1]

Noun[edit]

loc m (indefinite plural loce, definite singular locja, definite plural locet)

  1. dear, darling

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir (1998), “loc”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Cologne: Brill, →ISBN, page 230

Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin locus. Compare Daco-Romanian loc.

Noun[edit]

loc n (plural locuri)

  1. place, location
  2. land, soil, earth
  3. country, region

Synonyms[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Irish loc (hindrance), from Middle English lok.

Noun[edit]

loc m (genitive singular loic, nominative plural loic)

  1. (obsolete) hindrance

Verb[edit]

loc (present analytic locann, future analytic locfaidh, verbal noun locadh, past participle loctha)

  1. Ulster form of loic (to shirk, flinch)

Conjugation[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *luką.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

loc n

  1. lock
  2. that by which anything is closed (e.g. bolt, bar, etc.)
  3. an enclosed space, enclosure, fold
Declension[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

lōc

  1. Alternative form of lōca

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old English loc, from Proto-Germanic *luką.

Noun[edit]

loc m (oblique plural los, nominative singular los, nominative plural loc)

  1. lock
    • (Can we date this quote?), La Vie de St Thomas
      Mes a cel ore esteit a un grant loc fermee
      But at this hour, it was closed with a big lock

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Proto-Brythonic *llog (whence Welsh llog), from Latin locus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

loc m

  1. place (usually inhabited, or suited thereto)
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 23d23
      Cía thés hí loc bes ardu, ní ardu de; ní samlid són dúnni, air ⟨im⟩mi ardu-ni de tri dul isna lucu arda.
      Though he may go into a higher place, he is not the higher; this is not the case for us, for we are the higher through going into the high places.

Inflection[edit]

Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative loc locL luicL
Vocative luic locL lucuH
Accusative locN locL lucuH
Genitive luicL loc locN
Dative lucL locaib locaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
loc
also lloc after a proclitic
loc
pronounced with /l(ʲ)-/
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Old Occitan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin locus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

loc m (oblique plural locs, nominative singular locs, nominative plural loc)

  1. place

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin locus, from Old Latin stlocus, from Proto-Indo-European *stel- (to put, place, locate).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

loc n (plural locuri)

  1. place, location

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English lock.

Noun[edit]

loc m (plural lociau, not mutable)

  1. lock (on a canal)

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

loc

  1. Soft mutation of lloc (enclosure, pen).

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
lloc loc unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.