loc

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See also: lọc and LOC

English[edit]

Noun[edit]

loc ‎(plural locs)

  1. (informal, chiefly in the plural) A dreadlock.

Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *lātjā, from the same root of lot 'teardrop'[1].

Noun[edit]

loc m (indefinite plural loce, definite singular locja, definite plural locet)

  1. dear, darling
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir (1998), “loc”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Köln: Brill, page 230

Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin locus. Compare Daco-Romanian loc.

Noun[edit]

loc n ‎(plural locuri)

  1. place, location
  2. land, soil, earth
  3. country, region

Synonyms[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *luką.

Noun[edit]

loc n

  1. lock

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Old English loc, from Proto-Germanic *luką.

Noun[edit]

loc m ‎(oblique plural los, nominative singular los, nominative plural loc)

  1. lock
    • La Vie de St Thomas
      Mes a cel ore esteit a un grant loc fermee
      But at this hour, it was closed with a big lock

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Noun[edit]

loc m

  1. place (usually inhabited, or suited thereto)

Inflection[edit]

Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative
Vocative
Accusative
Genitive
Dative
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • loc” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Old Provençal[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin locus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

loc m ‎(oblique plural locs, nominative singular locs, nominative plural loc)

  1. place

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin locus, from Old Latin stlocus, from Proto-Indo-European *stel-(to put, place, locate).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

loc n ‎(plural locuri)

  1. place, location

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowing from English lock.

Noun[edit]

loc m (plural lociau)

  1. lock (on a canal)

Etymology 2[edit]

Soft mutation of lloc(enclosure, pen).

Noun[edit]

loc

  1. Soft mutation of lloc.

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
lloc loc unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.