col

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French col, from Latin collum (neck).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

col (plural cols)

  1. (geography) A dip on a mountain ridge between two peaks.
    Coordinate terms: bealach, mountain pass, pass, saddle, hause
    • 1999, Harish Kapadia, “Ascents in the Panch Chuli Group”, in Across Peaks & Passes in Kumaun Himalaya, New Delhi: Indus Publishing Company, →ISBN, page 136:
      We spent half an hour on the summit before returning to our camp, where we stuffed the frozen tent and all the gear into our packs and started the long descent of the southwest ridge to rejoin Harish and others who were still encamped on the col at the foot of it.
  2. (meteorology) A pressure region between two anticyclones and two low-pressure regions.

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a contraction of the preposition con (with) + masculine singular article el (the).

Contraction[edit]

col m (feminine cola, neuter colo, masculine plural colos, feminine plural coles)

  1. with the

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin caulis, caulem (stalk, stem), from Ancient Greek καυλός (kaulós, stem of a plant).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

col f (plural cols)

  1. cabbage

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Dalmatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *cu illu < Latin eccum illum. Compare Italian quello, Romanian acel, Old French cil, Spanish aquel.

Pronoun[edit]

col

  1. that

Dutch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From French col (collar), from Latin collum (neck).

Noun[edit]

col m (plural cols, diminutive colletje n)

  1. (informal, Belgium) (clothing) collar
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

col m (plural collen, diminutive colletje n)

  1. (informal, Belgium) (sports) mountain pass
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From French colle

Noun[edit]

col f (uncountable)

  1. (informal, Belgium) glue
Synonyms[edit]

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French col, from Latin collum (neck). Doublet of cou.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

col m (plural cols)

  1. collar
  2. col
  3. neck (now especially of objects, vases etc.)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Galician[edit]

Coles or verzas

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese col (13th century, Cantigas de Santa Maria), from an older unattested *coule, from Latin caulis. Cognate with Portuguese couve and Spanish col.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

col f (plural coles)

  1. collard; wild mustard, wild cabbage; kale; Brassica oleracea var. acephala
    Synonyms: coella, verza

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • col” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • coles” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • couues” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • col” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • col” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • col” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German Zoll.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈt͡sol]
  • Hyphenation: col

Noun[edit]

col (plural colok)

  1. inch

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative col colok
accusative colt colokat
dative colnak coloknak
instrumental collal colokkal
causal-final colért colokért
translative collá colokká
terminative colig colokig
essive-formal colként colokként
essive-modal
inessive colban colokban
superessive colon colokon
adessive colnál coloknál
illative colba colokba
sublative colra colokra
allative colhoz colokhoz
elative colból colokból
delative colról colokról
ablative coltól coloktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
colé coloké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
coléi colokéi
Possessive forms of col
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. colom coljaim
2nd person sing. colod coljaid
3rd person sing. colja coljai
1st person plural colunk coljaink
2nd person plural colotok coljaitok
3rd person plural coljuk coljaik

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tótfalusi, István. Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmező és etimológiai szótára (’A Storehouse of Foreign Words: an explanatory and etymological dictionary of foreign words’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2005. →ISBN

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish col, from Proto-Celtic *kulom.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

col m (genitive singular coil, nominative plural colanna)

  1. prohibition
  2. sin, lust
  3. violation
  4. dislike
  5. incest
  6. relation, relationship

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
col chol gcol
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Italian[edit]

Contraction[edit]

col

  1. contraction of con il; with the

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French col, from Latin collum.

Noun[edit]

col m (plural cols)

  1. (anatomy) the neck

Descendants[edit]

  • French: cou, col

Old English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *kōluz, *kōlaz. Cognate with Old High German kuoli.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cōl (comparative cōlra, superlative cōlost)

  1. cool (not hot or warm)
Declension[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *kulą. Cognate with Old Frisian kole, Old High German kolo, Old Norse kol.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

col n (nominative plural colu)

  1. coal
Declension[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin collum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

col m (oblique plural cous or cox or cols, nominative singular cous or cox or cols, nominative plural col)

  1. (anatomy) neck

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *kulom.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

col n (genitive cuil)

  1. sin, violation

Inflection[edit]

Neuter o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative colN colN colL, cola
Vocative colN colN colL, cola
Accusative colN colN colL, cola
Genitive cuilL col colN
Dative colL colaib colaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Descendants[edit]

  • Irish: col
  • Scottish Gaelic: col (incest)

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
col chol col
pronounced with /ɡ(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish col (sin).

Noun[edit]

col m (genitive singular cola, plural colan)

  1. incest

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German Zoll.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cȏl m (Cyrillic spelling цо̑л)

  1. inch

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin caulis, caulem (stalk, stem), from Ancient Greek καυλός (kaulós, stem of a plant).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

col f (plural coles)

  1. cabbage
    Synonyms: berza, repollo

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Tocharian B[edit]

Adjective[edit]

col

  1. wild

Vilamovian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cōl m (plural cōln)

  1. inch (unit of measure)