caulis

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin caulis. Doublet of cole.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

caulis (plural caules)

  1. (architecture) Each of the main stalks which support the volutes and helices of a Corinthian capital.
  2. (botany) The stalk of a plant, especially a herbaceous stem in its natural state.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

caulīs

  1. dative plural of caulae
  2. ablative plural of caulae

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *keh₂u-l-i-. Cognate with Sanskrit कुल्या (kulyā), Ancient Greek καυλός (kaulós, stem), Latvian kauls, and Old English cāl (> English cole).[1]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

caulis m (genitive caulis); third declension

  1. stalk, stem
  2. stem of a cabbage
Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun (i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative caulis caulēs
Genitive caulis caulium
Dative caulī caulibus
Accusative caulem caulēs
caulīs
Ablative caule caulibus
Vocative caulis caulēs
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Dalmatian: caul
  • Italian: cavolo
  • Old French: chous
  • Old Galician / Old Portuguese: col
  • Old Occitan: caul
  • Old Portuguese: couve
  • Old Spanish:
  • Sardinian: càule
  • Sicilian: cavulu, càvulu, caulu, càulu
  • Venetian: càvol, càorlo, càoło
  • Proto-Brythonic: *kawl (see there for further descendants)
  • English: caulis (learned)
  • Catalan: caule (semi-learned)
  • Italian: caule (semi-learned)
  • Macedonian: кељ (kelj)
  • Proto-West Germanic: *kauli (see there for further descendants)
  • Portuguese: caule (semi-learned)

References[edit]

  • caulis in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • caulis in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • caulis in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7)‎[1], Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN