cole

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See also: Cole and colé

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

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Wikispecies From Middle English, from Old English cāwel, from Germanic, from Latin caulis (cabbage). Cognate with Dutch kool, German Kohl

Noun[edit]

cole (usually uncountable, plural coles)

  1. Cabbage.
  2. Brassica; a plant of the Brassica genus, especially those of Brassica oleracea (rape and coleseed).
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

cole (plural coles)

  1. (Scotland) A stack or stook of hay.
    • 1932, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Sunset Song, Polygon 2006 (A Scots Quair), p. 39:
      Father saw the happening from high in a park where the hay was cut and they set the swathes in coles, and he swore out Damn't to hell! and started to run [...].

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Verb[edit]

cole

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of colar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of colar

Chinook Jargon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English cold.

Adjective[edit]

cole

  1. cold

Antonyms[edit]

Noun[edit]

cole

  1. winter
  2. year

Antonyms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

cole

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of colō

Lower Sorbian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cole

  1. locative singular of coło
  2. nominative dual of coło
  3. accusative dual of coło

Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

cole

  1. First-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of colar
  2. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present subjunctive of colar
  3. Third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of colar
  4. Third-person singular (você) negative imperative of colar

Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Origin uncertain; possibly from Old French coillir (Modern French cueillir) or Old Norse kollr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cole (plural coles)

  1. (archaic, agriculture) A hay-cock, hay-rick, bundle of straw.

Verb[edit]

tae cole (third-person singular simple present coles, present participle colein, simple past colet, past participle colet)

  1. (archaic, agriculture) To put hay in a cole.

Derived terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From colegio

Noun[edit]

cole m (plural coles)

  1. (colloquial) school