Kohl

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See also: kohl

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German Kohl.

Proper noun[edit]

Kohl (plural Kohls)

  1. A surname, from German​.

Statistics[edit]

  • According to the 2010 United States Census, Kohl is the 3806th most common surname in the United States, belonging to 9303 individuals. Kohl is most common among White (95.02%) individuals.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

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Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle High German [Term?], from Old High German kōlo.

Noun[edit]

Kohl m (genitive Kohles or Kohls, plural Kohle)

  1. cabbage (plant of the genus Brassica)
Declension[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
  • Kraut (synonymous in southern regions only)
Derived terms[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Kohl ? (genitive Kohl)

  1. An occupational surname, from occupations for a grower or seller of cabbages.

Etymology 2[edit]

Unclear. Several possibilities have been suggested, including derivation from Romani [Term?] and derivation from Hebrew קוֹל(qōl, voice). But compare western German Kappes (cabbage, nonsense), though the second meaning might also be a loan translation of Kohl.

Noun[edit]

Kohl m (genitive Kohles or Kohls, no plural)

  1. (possibly dated) nonsense; idle talk
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Kohl” in Duden online

Hunsrik[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German and Old High German kol.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Kohl f (plural Kohle)

  1. coal

Noun[edit]

Kohl m

  1. cabbage

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German Kohl.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Kohl m or f

  1. A surname in German

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kohl in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Pennsylvania German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German and Old High German kol. Compare German Kohle, Dutch kool, English coal.

Noun[edit]

Kohl f (plural Kohle)

  1. coal